VIRGINIA BROERSMA

Making of A Bright and Guilty Place

Posted on September 19, 2017

 

 

 

 

A Bright and Guilty Place

Posted on July 12, 2017

 

COMING UP: 

 

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Open Studio as part of Maiden LA

Saturday August 12, 3-6pm 

Orson Welles described Los Angeles as "a bright and guilty place," which is also a fitting context for Virginia Broersma's recent work.
Broersma is an artist and sometimes curator whose paintings focus on the representation of the human form
in moments of hyperawareness of one's own body.

Come visit her studio to see recent work and have a drink with the artist. 

656 W. Arbor Vitae, Inglewood, CA 90301

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Map available HERE; full event list available HERE.

 

 

Categories: event

Art and Cake

Posted on June 10, 2017

"A Painter and a Performance Artist walk into a bar..." featured on Art and Cake in an article by Amy Kaeser. 

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"Starting something new is always exciting and nerve-racking at the same time, especially when you make that experiment public. The exhibition, “A Painter and a Performance Artist walk into a Bar…” contemplate new interdisciplinary modes of communication between Long Beach-based artist and curator Virginia Broersma and performance artist and Grab Bag Studio co-founder, Natalie Mik. They set out to explore the intersection of this discourse through this thoughtful collaboration on view by appointment until June 25th."

Read the full article HERE

 

 

Categories: press

Installation views of Grab Bag Studio

Posted on June 08, 2017

 

A PAINTER AND A PERFORMANCE ARTIST WALK INTO A BAR

Collaboration and Exhibition with Natalie Mik at Grab Bag Studio
2626 E. 10th St., Long Beach, CA

Exhibition on view: June 5 - 25 , 2017
Opening reception: June 3, 2017 6:30-9pm

 

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Categories: exhibition

Opening of A Painter and a Performance Artist Walk Into a Bar

Posted on June 08, 2017

 

Opening Reception + Dinner Party for A PAINTER AND A PERFORMANCE WALK INTO A BAR

At Grab Bag Studio, Long Beach, CA. June 3, 2017

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Categories: exhibition, event

Long Beach Post Write-up about Collaboration at Grab Bag Studio

Posted on May 23, 2017

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Read the full article by Asia Morris HERE

Categories: press

A Painter and a Performance Artist Walk Into a Bar....

Posted on May 22, 2017

 

 

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Grab Bag Studio is pleased to present:

A Painter and a Performance Artist walk into a Bar…

A Dialogue & Exhibition with Virginia Broersma

June 5 – June 25, 2017 

 

Long Beach, CA – June, 2017 – Grab Bag Studio is thrilled to present "A Painter and a Performance Artist walk into a Bar..." a collaboration with Long Beach-based artist and curator Virginia Broersma, facilitated by GBS co-founder Natalie Mik. The collaboration will manifest in a private dinner event followed by a public opening reception for a wall display featuring Broersma's latest paintings together with remnants of the dinner conversation. The public opening reception will be held on June 3rd, 6:30 pm - 9 pm and the exhibition will be on view until from June 5th to June 25th, 2017.

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When Natalie Mik asked Virginia Broersma to show her work for an exhibition at GBS, both quickly realized that collaborating on a conversation-based and process-oriented community project could be an interesting and challenging endeavor. As both artists who also work as curators, Broersma and Mik are interested in interdisciplinary dialogue. While Mik’s practice looks at art through the lenses of performativity, Broersma identifies herself primarily as a painter, yet through conversation, they found common ground with specific themes and motivations within their work.

"If we as artists are considering similar things, how do a painter and a performance artist collaborate/communicate? Is a translation needed between our mediums, and what would that be? If we are both dealing with (re)presentation but in different ways, what is the thing/idea/source we are representing - the thing we have in common perhaps?" (text from email exchange)

"A Painter and a Performance Artist walk into a Bar..." creates artistic modes and strategies to these questions. Over the month of June, Mik and Broersma will begin the process of collaborating or perhaps better put, figuring out how to collaborate. The rules have to be reinvented. There will be no set goals, no formalized expectations but more willingness to trust each other. A dialogue with an experimental spirit and an openness to listen to each other will over the course of the month be documented in the space with remnants, notes, ideas, and unforeseen materializations.

On Saturday, June 3rd, their process opens to the public and the local art community. Grab Bag Studio invites you to join their conversation on how to collaborate. We will think about ideas of communication, cross-disciplinary work, how an idea materializes, how bridges are formed. Mik and Broersma found their common ground with themes surrounding the representation of the body and the collective archive and how these shape and define us as people.  Diverse points of view and perspectives on these topics are invited and welcomed.

Grab Bag Studio encourages experimentation, testing out ideas and developing community and this shared process will be a way of tracking the development of an idea. 

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About Virginia Broersma (www.virginiabroersma.com)

Virginia Broersma lives and works in Long Beach and Los Angeles. Her primary focus as an artist is with issues surrounding the body and its representation. She has exhibited extensively in Los Angeles, as well in Tokyo, Berlin, New York, and Chicago among other US and international cities. Additionally, Broersma takes on select curatorial and writing projects that relate to her interests in the studio and in 2016 was jointly selected for the Emerging Curators Program at Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions (LACE). Broersma has been the recipient of several grants including funding from the California Institute of Contemporary Arts, the Puffin Foundation and was awarded a Community Arts Assistance Program grant from the City of Chicago, IL, which she received in both 2010 and 2011. Broersma is also a contributor to the Huffington Post Blog.

  

About Grab Bag Studio (www.thegrabbagstudio.com)

Grab Bag Studio is a shared studio and an artist collective in Long Beach, Ca.

GBS’s public program draws directly from our local community of artists & curators by offering exhibitions, workshops, open studios and more. Members rotate to curate diverse projects that are announced through the website and the newsletter. 

At GBS, the members produce work as well as foster a place for promotion and participation in pursuit of a collective well-being less based on shared ideologies or aesthetic but rather through sharing physical space, equipment, organizational support and other practical needs of the artist. In this regard, GBS is a community project among and between the resident members and the local Long Beach art community.

Grab Bag Studio is open by appointment and is located on 2626 E. 10th St. Long Beach, CA. 

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Categories: exhibition

Back in the studio...

Posted on April 05, 2017

 

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"Ecstasy" Featured on Wall Street International

Posted on March 07, 2017

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Full article here.

 

 

Categories: press

"Ecstasy" write-up in Art and Cake

Posted on February 02, 2017

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The Ecstasy of Mary Shelley Photo Credit Kio Griffith

The Ecstasy of Mary Shelley Photo Credit Kio Griffith

The Ecstasy of Mary Shelley: Provocative Art at LACE

By Genie Davis

Through February 12th

 

Three curators from LACE’s Emerging Curators Program have put together a compelling seven-artist group show in The Ecstasy of Mary Shelley. Closing February 12th, this show vibrates with the dichotomy of pleasure and pain, the flip sides of that coin and the way in which moments of transformation are bound to and cause both.

Curated by Virginia Broersma, Nick Brown and Kio Griffith, the works here engage on a serious level, with subjects such as religious experiences, race, gender, and sexual identity permeating richly evocative artworks.

The exhibit is decidedly poetic, touching on the thematic conundrum that we may indeed be inspired from something as horrific as a mad scientist creating a new life. Or that we are in fact that scientist. Our own internal alchemy is both wondrous and terrifying. With Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein as the show’s inspiration, we are looking at the fearsome as inspirational, and the inspiration, the impulse to create, as perhaps more than a little frightening itself. We are looking, in short, at the passion of creation and the transformative and terrifying aspects of change that creation can bring.

The curators have described their show as both “exhibition and lab,” with some works drawing from history, others an homage to literature. Artists exhibiting include Cassils, Nathan Danilowicz, Valerie Hegarty, Naotaka Hiro, Candice Lin, Gala Porras-Kim, and Annie Lapin. The experiment is in the eyes of the viewer.

The Ecstasy of Mary Shelley Photo Credit Kristine Schomaker

The Ecstasy of Mary Shelley Photo Credit Kristine Schomaker

Viewers enter the exhibit by way of a passage created by artist Nathan Danilowicz’s Volans Anguli. This piece evolves as one enters the gallery from overpowering black beams to flying buttresses toward the back of the room. These suggest images of a shattered cathedral or the bones of a ruined giant.

Candice Lin offers The Worm Husband a hand-blown terrarium in which silkworms weave cocoons. Transformation, re-imagining, and a striking commentary on something that is taken over, adapted without choice strike the viewer. Valerie Hegarty’s “Ghost of History” uses distortion, painting and repainting, to create a new take on a historical painting of George Washington. Her changes are not positive – she may or may not be referencing our present political state: perhaps there are no more “patriots” and we are instead subsumed into something far darker, more inchoate. Hegarty also exhibits an installation that includes thickly layered painted papers on the floor and walls, which is then peeled back. Secrets? Other places, hidden? Have we covered or are in the process of exhuming transformation?

 

Notaka Hiro’s video is dark and dreamlike, another take on transformation. Night and Fog, Tubes on Black Mountain is both nightmare and vision, a response to a film he himself saw about the Holocaust. Viewers watch a somewhat loathsome image of sausage meat unraveling, falling apart, like all flesh torn asunder. Ashes to ashes and meat to – meat.

Another video work, by transgender artist Cassils, takes viewers along on a performance of Tiresias who transformed from man to woman. Here the artist’s body is pressed into an ice carving of a Greek statue, melting that ice with body heat. This video appears as a commentary on transformation as painful as well as on the transience of any form.

The Ecstasy of Mary Shelley Photo Credit Kristine Schomaker

The Ecstasy of Mary Shelley
Photo Credit Kristine Schomaker

From the exhibit’s title and the elegiac feel of these artworks the exhibition is a tribute both poignant and powerful, a tribute above all else, to change itself. To the imagination, the dreams, the nightmare, the often dark alchemy of human existence, and our insistence on telling our story, whether in the words of Mary Shelley or in the visionary art exhibited here.

LACE is located at 6522 Hollywood Blvd. in Hollywood.

 

See the full article and pictures on the Art and Cake website. 

 

 

Categories: press

Curators: Emerging into what?

Posted on January 30, 2017

 

I am pleased to be a panelist for this upcoming discussion:

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CURATORS: EMERGING INTO WHAT?
Panel Discussion as part of the Annual Emerging Curators Program
Presented by LACE and art ltd.
Saturday February 4, 2017 2-4 PM
  
The current exhibition at LACE, The Ecstasy of Mary Shelley offers a forum to this year’s group of emerging curators. But for all its mystique, the role of the curator in the art world is constantly evolving, and can vary greatly with different types of cultural institutions and the social, political and economical situation of the time. How is the role of the curator in today’s art world changing?  How do today’s curators see the art world changing around them, and what are the challenges and priorities that they need to respond to?  How do today’s emerging and independent curators navigate issues of globalization and institutional authority, working with limited resources or outside of large institutional support systems?
 
How do we understand the curatorial practice, considering the recent history and the institutionalization of the practice by museums, biennials, art fairs, and universities?
 
To examine these questions and more, LACE joins forces with art ltd. magazine. Hosted by LACE and moderated by art ltd. editor George Melrod and LACE curatorial associate Daniela Lieja Quintanar, the panel discussion will emphasize the role of curators working outside the larger institutions to advance independent visions and will feature both emerging and established curators working in Los Angeles. Topics addressed will include the unique role of non-profit art institutions and alternate spaces as well as the upcoming LA/LA exhibitions through PST. The event promises probing questions, thoughtful inquiry, and of course, refreshing beverages.
 
Panelists include:
 
George Melrodart ltd. editor
Daniela Lieja Quintanar, Curatorial Associate, LACE
Virginia Broersma, Co-curator of The Ecstasy of Mary Shelley
Michael Duncan, Critic and independent curator
Idurre Alonso, Associate Curator of Latin American Art, Getty Research Institute
 
 

 

Categories: event

"Ecstasy" reviewed in CARLA

Posted on January 26, 2017

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The Ecstasy of Mary Shelley at LACE

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The Ecstasy of Mary Shelley at LACE (installation view). Image courtesy of Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions. Image: Chris Wormald.

Taking its title from two stories of profound transformation, The Ecstasy of Mary Shelley fills LACE with a lugubrious installation of works by Los Angeles artists that feels appropriate to the political cataclysms of 2017. Between the religious highs of the Ecstasy of Saint Teresa and the monstrous overtones of Shelley’s Frankenstein, the common ground presented by the objects on view centers firmly around the body, its representation, and its intimation.

Figures abound throughout the dimly-lit gallery, including those of the live incubated silkworms in Candice Lin’s The Worm Husband (Our Father)(2016) and in Cassils’ video Tiresias (2013), in which the artist presses themself against an icy Greek male torso, melting it gradually to reveal the artist’s nude form. Bodies are implied in Nathan Danilowicz’s imposingVolans Anguli (2016), an installation of pitch-black L-beams that dwarf onlookers as they weave between them. The intestinal raw sausage casings that curl around a ziggurat in Naotaka Hiro’s Night and Fog, Tubes on Black Mountain (2010), and the devastating Holocaust film alluded to by the video’s title, offer a darker version of visceral confrontation.

Does the exhibition mark a contemporary return to figuration? In reality it never left, particularly in L.A., with its history of body-based performances that gestured toward enlightened consciousness (Chris Burden, Barbara T. Smith) and MOCA’s 1992 exhibition Helter Skelter: L.A. Art in the 1990s, which canonized the likes of Paul McCarthy as venerable proponents of the abject. The Ecstasy of Mary Shelley aims to plant itself somewhere between these two interlocking strains; despite its curators’ use of moody atmosphere to dramatically emphasize mystery and transcendence, the overall pungency of the works on view remains grounded—auspiciously so—in the baser, physical qualities of human existence in which these artists clearly revel.

The Ecstasy of Mary Shelley is on view January 4–February 12, 2017 at LACE (6522 Hollywood Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90028).

 

Categories: press

"Echo Location" at Eastside International

Posted on January 23, 2017

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Echo Location curated by Lisa C Soto

a sonar mapping, a location of objects, people, across space.

in some sense a call, a response

one navigates, negotiates space, place, neighborhood, one’s community.

what are the rituals, rhythms? where are the borders, the markers, fixed or ephemeral?

Eastside International is pleased to present Echo Location, a group exhibition curated by Lisa C Soto. The exhibition features work by artists who participated in a series of talks at Soto’s Inglewood studio entitled “Conversations By Artists For Artists”, which began in November of 2015. The conversations were intended to build connectivity, cultivate empowerment, and provide an intimate space for the exchange of ideas, energies, and perspectives. In Echo Location the visions and voices of the twenty-three participating artists co-mingle again and offer an alternative mapping of LA’s creative landscape.

Featuring: Amitis Motevalli, Andy Moses, Cindy Rehm, Duane Paul, Glen Wilson, Isabelle Lutterodt, Jamaal Tolbert, John K. Chan, Kelly Berg, Kimberly Morris, Kysa Johnson, Kyungmi Shin, Lisa C Soto, Lisa Diane Wedgeworth, Lita Albuquerque, Martin Durazo, Michael Massenburg, Nery Gabriel Lemus, Raksha Parekh, Selwyn Hinds, Todd Gray, Virginia Broersma, Zeal Harris.

Exhibition designed by John K Chan of Formation Association.


February 18 - March 18, 2017
Reception: Saturday, February 25th, 7-10 PM
Gallery Hours beginning February 18th: Sat & Sun 1 to 5pm, or by appointment

Eastside International (ESXLA) 602 Moulton Ave, LA CA 90031
info@eastsideinternational.com
eastsideinternational.com

 

 

Categories: exhibition

"Ecstasy" Feature in Visual Art Source

Posted on January 23, 2017
 
 
 
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“The Ecstasy of Mary Shelley"
LACE, Hollywood, California 
Preview by Elenore Welles 


Candice Lin, "The Worm Husband (Our Father)" (detail), 2016. silkworms, tank, glazed porcelain, plaster and heating mechanism and miscellaneous plant material. 61 x 31 x 150 cm. Commissioned by Gasworks. Courtesy the artist. Photo: Andy Keate.

Continuing through February 12, 2017

“The Ecstasy of Mary Shelley” features seven artists who share a primal fascination with the process of transmutation. All share an almost bi-polar attraction to the highs and lows of existence, and each is particularly drawn to the pleasure/pain paradoxes associated with mutated existences. 

Conceptual associations are drawn from a variety of subjects and experiences, such as surreal dream imagery, ritual elements and political distress. However, as the title suggests, inspirations also stem from Mary Shelley’s Dr. Frankenstein, a mad scientist who created a living creature from dead material through experiments with electricity. Another key source is the narrative of St. Teresa of Avila’s (1515-1582) vision of spiritual ecstasy produced by thrusts to the heart by an angel with a golden spear. This was most notably depicted in Bernini’s sculpture “The Ecstasy of Saint Teresa” (1651).

Shelley (1797-1851) wrote her masterpiece in the early 19th century, when the science of electricity and pseudo-science of alchemy clashed with occult ideas. Frankenstein’s monster represented the potential for new scientific creations to go wrong, the implication being that monsters are not born but made. Considering the advances in science and technology in the two centuries since, we have unleashed the creation of some previously unimaginable monsters, such as nuclear weapons.

But it is the monsters within us that some of these artists attempt to fathom and exorcise. For some, transformative ideas may stem from surreal dreams or mythology, their focus centered on the intersections between science and mysticism. Others draw from historical and literary sources, using interdisciplinary methods to upend metaphorical monsters such as imperialism and colonialism.

Nathan Danilowitz’s large-scale installation serves as a passage into the exhibition. Starting at the front entry room, it  moves into the main gallery. Along the way, on black painted walls are geometrical drawings and architectural elements such as flying buttresses. Candice Lin’s “The Worm Husband (Our Father),” alludes to the forced adaptations produced by colonialism, particularly when societies with different ethnicities are conquered by predominantly white societies. In her hand-blown terrarium, silkworms weave cocoons, metaphorical references to how these worms were ostensibly used in creams to whiten naturally dark faces.

Valerie Hegarty subverts 19th century art historical revisionism in paintings that are repainted and then battered beyond recognition. “Ghost of History,” for example, was inspired by John Faed’s portrait of George Washington taking a salute at Trenton. Extending an earlier series where she redirects the narrative of American heroic paintings, she uses ruination as a method to distort the original works' idealism beyond recognition.

Cassils is a transgender artist [thus the second person plural pronoun is used in this article—Ed.] who demonstrates transcendence through ritual performance and body art. They exhibit a video of their performance “Tiresias,” a Greek mythological tale. A figure in ancient Thebes’ historical legends, Tiresias was transformed from a man into a woman. In the spirit of catharsis, Cassils, creates draconian performances as a way to transcend physical limitations. They follow in the footsteps of artists such as Chris Burden and Barry Le Va, who put themselves through extreme physical ordeals. Their “Tiresias" performance consists of pressing their body against the back of a Greek male torso carved out of ice. Over a 4 to 5 hour time period, they melt the ice with his body heat. It’s an attempt to prove that not only can transformation be a continuing process, it often includes pain and endurance as part of the price of admission.

Naotaka Hiro's video of his kinetic sculpture “Night and Fog, Tubes on Black Mountain” was created in response to a documentary he saw about the Holocaust. Hiro’s works, which stem at times from dream imagery, are often centered on interior body parts. His representations vacillate between the conceptual and literal, specifically when he breaks the body down to basic elements, such as entrails. In “Night and Fog,” a long tube of red meat slowly unravels as it swirls around the surface of a black ziggurat. Eventually falling apart, the images remind us that the remains of a body will decompose to oblivion.

As these artists attest, transformations can produce paradoxical mixtures of pain and fear. Or, as exemplified by the Frankenstein metaphor, they can also create chaos.

 

 

 

Categories: press

"Ecstasy" Review in Artillery Magazine

Posted on January 12, 2017

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Mary Shelley LACE 12

The Ecstasy of Mary Shelley

The curators of Ecstasy, Virginia Broersma, Nick Brown and Kio Griffith, characterize their show as an “exhibition and lab” (the latter aspect of which may be more prominent in a couple of the objects by Candice Lin included here); but its installation has the airy feel of a frame or skeleton – an open vessel for the viewer’s imagination. Their stated intention was to conflate the Shelley moment of terror that inspired her classic horror novel, Frankenstein, with the ‘ecstasy’ of Saint Teresa, but the inspiration is really the same: the Promethean fire urging humanity ever more ambitiously forward towards unlocking the secrets of the universe (or the gods), yet simultaneously unleashing the staggering hubris with which we desecrate that same universe. Nathan Danilowicz’s Volans Anguli, with its brutalist black beams fashioned into flying buttresses angled into the wall, or broken and criss-crossing each other, evoke both broken ‘skeleton’ and broken flight or ambition, even the civilization’s self-cannibalization. Annie Lapin’s paintings, hung mid-gallery as if they were doors (which in a sense they are) simultaneously evoke opacity amid transparency, a chthonic universe, and an ethereal bioplasm in constant flux. Naotaka Hiro has compressed what might be characterized as a similar birth process into a ziggurat of sausage (or shit) – rendered here as both video performance and sculpture. Works by Gala Porras-Kim, Valerie Hegarty, and video/performance artist, Cassils, and Candice Lin are no less striking. ‘Science project’ aspects aside, Lin projects in her five works here a ‘creatures of Prometheus’ vision – the notion of a pathway out of the gloom and chill that envelop us in civilization’s twilight.

 

Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions (LACE)
6522 Hollywood Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90028
Show runs thru February 12, 2017

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Categories: press

The Ecstasy of Mary Shelley

Posted on December 22, 2016

 


 
LACE EMERGING CURATORS: THE ECSTASY OF MARY SHELLEY

The Ecstasy of Mary Shelley
LACE Emerging Curators Program
Opening Reception: January 4, 2017 7-10PM
Exhibition Dates: January 5 – February 12, 2017

Curated by Virginia Broersma, Nick Brown and Kio Griffith

“With an anxiety that almost amounted to agony, I collected the instruments of life around me, that I might infuse a spark of being into the lifeless thing that lay at my feet…when, by the glimmer of the half-extinguished light, I saw the dull yellow eye of the creature open; it breathed hard, and a convulsive motion agitated its limbs.” – Mary Shelley

There is a striking parallel between the moment when an idea hits and the moment life is conducted into Dr. Frankenstein’s monster in Mary Shelley’s tale of a scientist’s Promethean experiment. Transformation occurs with a zap of electricity, a lightning strike, a neuron firing in the brain. The trajectory of life can be converted, mutated, revolutionized with a single flip of the switch. Ecstatic religious experiences, Satori or enlightenment, transmogrification, race, gender and sexual identity…what are the techniques, interventions and impetuses of these perceptual shifts and transformations? How do they manifest themselves and how are they maintained?

As with St. Teresa of Avila’s experience of rapturous thrusts to her heart – “So surpassing was the sweetness of this excessive pain, that I could not wish to be rid of it.” – transformation often comes with both pleasure and pain, agony and ecstasy, a dopamine high careening downward to lycanthropic depths.

The Ecstasy of Mary Shelley as an exhibition and lab will combine artists whose work exists in this space of conductivity between ecstatic highs and monstrous lows. Overlapping strategies run throughout the various artists’ works such as subverting a point in history or tapping into the ritualistic performances of the body; surrealistic dream imagery relating to the detritus of real life. As artists themselves, the curators have taken the idea of an exhibition and have used it as an opportunity for imagining how the agglomeration of these works will breathe life into the monster, or perhaps into a rapturous encounter, which remains to be seen.

Featuring:

Cassils
Nathan Danilowicz
Valerie Hegarty
Naotaka Hiro
Annie Lapin
Candice Lin
Gala Porras-Kim


Click here to read more about this year's Emerging Curators.

SUPPORT
Support for LACE and its programs are provided by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Bloomberg Philanthropies, the City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs, the Getty Foundation, the Los Angeles County Arts Commission, the MAP Fund, Metabolic Studios, a direct charitable activity of the Annenberg Foundation, the Visual Artists Network, a program of the National Performance Network, Wilhelm Family Foundation, Tito’s Handmade Vodka, Stone Brewing Co., and the members of LACE.
 
 
LOS ANGELES CONTEMPORARY EXHIBITIONS
6522 HOLLYWOOD BOULEVARD
LOS ANGELES, CA 90028
tel. (323)957-1777 | welcometolace.org

 

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Photos by Chris Wormald and Courtesy of LACE

 

 

Categories: exhibition

WOMEN ON THE FENCE at Mothership

Posted on October 26, 2016

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WOMEN ON THE FENCE

Works by Women, for Women

Desert Hot Springs, CA, November 5, 2016– WOMEN ON THE FENCE (WOTF) is a one-day paper show of radical LA artists in conjunction with the three-day women’s festival and retreat: MOTHERSHIP, brought to you by HER/LA, and curated by Hayley Barker and Andrea Marie Breilling. WOMEN ON THE FENCE: This one-day art show will feature the work of over 30 feminist women artists from Los Angeles. Works will be hung outdoors on the chain link fence that demarcates the interior space of the MOTHERSHIP festival. MOTHERSHIP is a three-day outdoor festival for women that features feminist and queer-friendly music, workshops, camping, and community.

Artists in WOTF include: Lilly Aldriedge, Shaga Ariannia, Sarah Awad, Hayley Barker, Andrea Marie Breilling, Virginia Broersma, Alika Cooper, Akina Cox, Nikki Darling,Yasmine Diaz, Sarita Dougherty, Catherine Fairbanks, Nikita Gale, Rema Ghuloum, Sarah Gilbert, Meghan Gordan, Trulee Grace Hall, Kyla Hansen, Melissa Huddleston, Angie Jennings, Kara Joslyn, Molly Larkey, Sophie Lee, Clare Little, Tiffany Livingston, Kristy Luck, Annelie McKenzie, Erin Morrison, Megan Mueller, Erika Ostrander, Lauren Quin, Rachel Roske, Nancy Stella Soto, Shanna Waddell, Julie Weitz, Suné Woods, Lindsay Preston Zappas.

Only ticketholders/attendees of the festival will be able to view the show. At the WOTF show, art will be displayed and for sale. Donations will be accepted towards a cash award that will be raffled off one to our participating artists.

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MOTHERSHIP is sponsored by HER/LA is a volunteer-run, feminist collective, celebrating community and culture. HER/LA describes their position as:

the anti-mean girls,
the new wave riot grrrl,
sex-positive, LGBTQ encompassing, ultra-inclusive creatives,
who believe in the power of women supporting other women.
We believe a good time and expanding minds are not mutually exclusive.

WOMEN ON THE FENCE is partnering with HER/LA because we believe that now is the time to stand together. In a political climate where misogyny, racism, and nationalism have reigned, we are actively seeking to create a radical feminist space where art can be (at least for one day) used to empower and include one another with love and respect. We aim to make a temporary community that honors pleasure as political.

 

 

Categories: exhibition

Beach Bodies: The Dysmorphic Abstractions of Virginia Broersma

Posted on October 20, 2016

This essay was commissioned by Peripheral Vision Arts through their Publication Fellowship program. My sincere thanks to PVA for awarding me the inauguaral Fellowship and to Grace Linden for writing such an exceptional essay about my work. 

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Bouquet

Figure 1: Virginia Broersma, Myself As A Bouquet (For You), Oil on canvas, 45 x 36 inches, 2015

  

Beach Bodies: The Dysmorphic Abstractions of Virginia Broersma

by Grace Linden

 

Virginia Broersma does not remember when she first became aware of appearance. But feelings about her own body and bodies more generally, have been “locked…into [her] psyche”[1] since she was a teenager. She explains, “My image of my own body has always been linked to what others think of me and their standards.”[2] Broersma’s artistic practice, consequently, has been an effort to resolve these views.

Broersma is a painter in the traditional sense. Her brushwork is gestural and sweeping, and extends to the edges of the canvas. The colors are layered, bright, and multi-hued, and the impasto technique coupled with the rich tones adds texture to the canvas. All of these painterly methods put Broersma’s treatment of the body, specifically the female body, in dialogue with paintings of the past. Consider her 2014 painting Sunbather (Odalisque) [Fig. 2], part of the series Dythrambic, in which an abstracted nude figure sprawls across a beach. A rounded stomach fixes the body while the limbs – too many to count! – radiate outwards. There is a long tradition of odalisques in art’s history and such paintings show a nude, reclining figure at the center of the canvas, often flanked by an attendant.  By titling her painting Sunbather (Odalisque), Broersma overtly situates her composition within this traditional art historical genre and its related discourses.

 

Sunbather_for_pv 

Figure 2: Sunbather (Odalisque), Oil on canvas, 60 x 90 inches, 2014 

 

From French, odalisque translates to a "female slave" or "concubine" in a harem, particular to Ottoman Turkey. Implicit in the definition is a sense of ownership: the nude female is to be gazed upon by men, and owned within that gaze.  The abstraction of the body, however, allows Broersma to subvert this relationship. While the figure is most likely female, evinced by the genitalia and curved thighs, the many flailing limbs transform the lower body into a gnarled, root-like mass, a sea creature stranded on land.  

Broersma’s practice explores questions of idealized Western standards of beauty and power structures of the gaze. While her work has obvious ties to other artists—Lisa Yuskavage comes to mind, but more on her later—perhaps it is best to locate these paintings within the greater, psychological debate surrounding body image and body dysmorphia. Body Dysmorphia Disorder (BDD) causes a distorted view of the body and creates anxiety about one’s appearance. In part, BDD is affected by dominant images of female beauty that are circulated so constantly by the media: slim, white, and impossibly attractive. In the recent article “‘Digitized Dysmorphia’ of the female body: the re/disfiguration of the image,” Isabelle Coy-Dibley examines the way that Western beauty and sex industries have “hyper-sexualized society” through their use of the female body as a “currency.”[3] She writes: “Rather than being naturally beautiful in a person’s own individuality, society continually prescribes a Westernized standard of beauty that unceasingly narrows, not just in waist size, but in the generic, homogenous perception of beauty it idealizes, which is often considered as white and able-bodied.”[4] In today’s image-culture, where the photograph governs all, one competes not just against media representations but also against one’s own self as documented across social media platforms.

“[Internet] technology,” writes Coy-Dibley, “frequently emphasizes and perpetuates certain standardizations of femininity.”[5] It also allows for one to constantly edit his or her digital avatar to promote a particular look. The ability to change one’s look for itself is not the problem, but rather that the expectations are so demanding and defined. Editing for the sake of editing is one process; editing to put forth and uphold unrealistic and narrow beauty norms only serves to further cement those norms.

It is within this framework that we can best situate Broersma’s practice. Early works from the series Knockout seem to directly take on the distortion promoted by the media. Mop-up or Wipeout (2013) appears to be a portrait, though everything figural in the painting is unrecognizable. Nevertheless, the swirling white and peach tones, encircled by a dark chestnut brown, suggest a face, though one that has been filtered excessively. That the face is present but cannot be identified as a face is characteristic of the ways in which digital tools can radically alter reality. With her dynamic and vigorous brushstrokes, Broersma has shown how easily flaws and individuating marks can be smoothed over until the person that remains dissolves into nothing. 

Broersma’s practice explicitly deals with the role of the gaze: Who does the looking and what is seen? But interestingly, these paintings implicate men and women, while earlier feminist works questioned the primacy of the male gaze. In her seminal essay, “Visual Pleasure in Narrative Cinema,” Laura Mulvey details the relationship between the looker (man) and the looked upon (woman):

In a world ordered by sexual imbalance, pleasure in looking has been split between active/male and passive/female. The determining male gaze projects its phantasy on to the female figure which is styled accordingly. In their traditional exhibitionist role women are simultaneously looked at and displayed with their appearance coded for strong visual and erotic impact.[6]

Consider again the odalisque, a woman who would have been actually owned by men. Sensuous representations of her body, such as Ingre’s famous Grande Odalisque (1814), encourage the (male) eye to linger on the female form. Men look; women are to be looked at and shaped for a male audience. Feminist art of the 1960s and 1970s challenged this binary by suggesting new ways of looking. Artists such as Judy Chicago, Hannah Wilke, and Carolee Schneeman defined a new vocabulary for considering the female body. When depicted by female artists, the nude body serves a different purpose.  

There is a striking link between Broersma’s paintings and feminist photographer Cindy Sherman’s Centerfold series. Sherman typically works in series, dressing up in various costumes to construct her scenarios. For the 1981 Centerfolds, she riffed on the centerfolds found in men’s magazines, but instead of sexy, pinup girls, Sherman’s characters look more like vulnerable victims. InUntitled #93 (1981), a girl lies in bed pulling the sheet up to her shoulders, bathed in a bright nighttime light. She stares unflinchingly ahead and looks preoccupied.  With the title "Centerfold" there is the implication of a certain type of representation, but Sherman deliberately upends this preconceived expectation. Similarly, by titling her 2013 series Knockout, Broersma suggests a specific narrative: the woman as a bombshell. In actuality, the series abstracts the female form making it dynamic, aggressive, and at times even frightening.

The association between the body and abstraction remains an essential element in Broersma’s paintings. Trophies is a 2015-16 series of twelve paintings that transform the female body into flora. In Myself as a Bouquet (For You), 2015 [Fig. 1], indistinct corporeal forms are grafted to floral elements suggesting a painful process of metamorphosis. Offset by green and brown leaf-life shapes, these bodily elements are being gifted to us the viewer. While flowers are a typical courtship ritual, here the female body is proffered instead-- much as women are assessed daily. At the center of the bouquet there is even a protruding pink tongue of a salivating suiter. Set against a bright and fanciful yellow backdrop, Broersma’s Myself as a Bouquet... hints at Lisa Yuskavage’s figurative paintings. Yuskavage has developed her “own genre of the female nude,”[7] and her compositions feature cartoonish, nymph-like women, often with exaggerated breasts and thighs. Yuskavage representations are more literal, but both artists inflate and embellish their representations of women to highlight society’s disfigurement of the female body.

Trophies demonstrates a maturation in Broersma’s work which is best exemplified in Pool Party Jitters (2016) [Fig. 3]. Curved soft forms – limbs – are braided together and float against a crystal blue. Intertwining with this mass is blue and white cloth which can be easily read as a swimsuit. Like the earlier Sunbather (Odalisque)Pool Party Jitters, too, negotiates the same themes of beach body culture, body shame, and the extreme pressures placed on women. Unlike its predecessor however, the latter canvas is much more beguiling. Sunbather (Odalisque)’s recognizable lounging woman is a straightforward attack on the values Western society holds dear; Pool Party Jitters instead shows the dissolution of the self, or what happens when those values come to govern all. It is a much more damning portrait of beauty standard’s effects on women at large.

 
Figure 3: Pool Party Jitters, Oil on canvas, 20 x 16 inches, 2016

Figure 3: Pool Party Jitters, Oil on canvas, 20 x 16 inches, 2016

 

Broersma’s practice emerged directly from her own experiences with men, with the world, and with herself. As a result of this controlled engagement, her paintings present ruminations on white female beauty. Her color pallet is (mostly) limited to rosy pinks, peachy oranges, and hues of beige. There are few paintings that do use darker colors such as Hold Me Tight and Grotto, but as both of these look especially vegetal, the connections between organic forms and the human body are obscured. Indeed it could be argued that Grotto is actually just a landscape and not at all figurative. While the lack of diversity is noticeable, it is not necessarily problematic. Broersma is clear to explain that Trophies, in particular, mines her own life experiences: “I manipulate the visual representation of a person to regain agency in how I choose to present myself and the body.”[8] The representation is narrow because she only knows her own experiences. These are, consequently, intensely intimate images.

Equally thought-provoking is this idea of the individual in art. So much of art’s history has focused on the unique genius; only recent modern studies have cast aside biography-centric approaches in favor of new methodologies. Not to spend too much time belaboring this point, but nonetheless it is interesting to consider how large a role biography plays in Broersma’s practice. Instead of denying any personal resonance with the works created, Broersma embraces (and heightens) the biographical elements. Her practice is truly a return to earlier techniques and considerations but viewed through a decidedly contemporary lens.

Like other feminist artists, Broersma asks that both men and women look, and look closely. All the looking, and the supersaturation of the present day image-culture, ensures that we remain hyper aware of what it means to be scrutinized and ogled. But Broersma also asks that we look at ourselves and that we try and see through a true mirror. (And that we root out that which causes distortion.) By using her body and life to refract these experiences, Broersma sacrifices privacy in the name of dialogue and protest. The works make clear that she will not stand idly by; she will not be gazed into submission.

 --

[1] Artist’s statement as found on the artist’s website.

[2] IBID.

[3] Isabelle Coy-Dibley, “‘Digitized Dysmorphia’ of the female body: the re/disfiguration of the image.” Palgrave Communications, 05 June 2016. Accessed 6 October 2016. http://www.palgrave-journals.com/articles/palcomms201640

[4] IBID.

[5] IBID.

[6] Laura Mulvey, “Visual Pleasure in Narrative Cinema.” Film Theory and Criticism: Introductory Readings. Edited by Leo Braudy and Marshall Cohen. (New York: Oxford University Press, 1999) p. 837

[7] “Lisa Yuskavage – Biography.” David Zwirner. (Accessed on 12 October 2016) http://www.davidzwirner.com/artists/lisa-yuskavage/biography/

[8] Artist’s statement as found on the artist’s website.

 

 

Categories: press, text

Now Be Here - Over 700 women artists gather for photo

Posted on August 29, 2016

...and I was there.

 NytimesNowbehere

LOS ANGELES — A group of 733 female artists gathered on Sunday in the sunny courtyard of the Hauser Wirth & Schimmel gallery for “Now Be Here,” which its organizers call the largest group portrait of working artists taken in this city’s history. - Jori Finkel, New York Times

"For artist Kim Schoenstadt, it began as a simple idea: Bring together a group of female artists from around Los Angeles for a group portrait — a way of recognizing the presence of women in a field that remains dominated by men." - Carolina Miranda, LA Times 

Read more about Now Be Here in the New York Times and The LA Times.

 

Categories: event

Ruinous decadence.

Posted on August 22, 2016

 

 

Screen_shot

 

 

Categories: press

Publication Fellowship from Peripheral Vision Arts

Posted on July 11, 2016

 

The inaugural Publication Fellowships from Peripheral Vision Arts were recently announced and I am pleased to have been awarded a fellowship. 

Peripheral Vision Arts is an online art criticism publication and curatorial platform connecting emerging and mid-career artists, architects, and designers with critics in their fields of specialty. Peripheral Vision collaborates with creators and art writers to publish original content through competitive, merit-based Publication Fellowships. 

An essay on my work will be published in August and you can view more info on Peripheral Vision's website.

Bouquet

Myself As a Bouquet (For You),  oil on canvas, 45 x 36 inches, 2015

Categories: text

Homing Pigeon: Edition 5 in Finland

Posted on June 06, 2016

I am pleased to be included in the 5th iteration of Homing Pigeon - curated by Kio Griffith - on view in Finland. 

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HOMING PIGEON 
Forum Kortteli, Turku & Naantali Spa Gallery, Naantali

Curators: Kio Griffith  & Ville Laaksonen
YHTEISTYÖ: Valokuvakeskus Peri (Turku)
Exhibition: 4.6. – 31.7. 2016 

Artists: Hiromichi Akahane | Naoko Akiyama | Shiva Aliabadi | Douglas Alvarez | Ismael de Anda III | Samule André | Michael Arata | Carmen Argote | Yajuro Bando | Terri Berman | Virginia Broersma | Nick Brown | Peter Bugg | Gul Cagin | Ako Castuera | Sean Chao | Sijia Chen | Sally Coates | Emily Counts | Sydney Croskery | Ludmil Dimitrov | Veronica Duarte | Tom Dunn | Mark Dutcher | Shigenori Ebata | Aya Niibo Edamoto | Doug Eisenstark | Gabriel Escalante | Bill Farroux | Roni Feldman | Jon Flack | Shingo Francis | David French | Sarajo Frieden | Tatsuya Fukunaga | Rema Ghuloum | Aaron Giesel | Allen D Glass II | Mat Gleason | Dean Gojobori | Audra Graziano | Michelle Carla Handel | Doug Harvey | Shisei Hashimura | Jun Hiraoka | Lusine Hovsepian | Bryan Ida | Mari Inukai | Aska Irie | Ichiro Irie | Yoko Irino | Yayoi Itami | Masaaki Iwama | Tomoyuki Iwanami | James Jack | William Kaminski | Kazumi Kashimura | Virginia Katz | Ayumi Kikuchi | Phil Kim | Kohl King | Celia Ko | Juri Koll | Norichika Koyama | Minako Kumagai | Gil Kuno | Masumi Kuramochi | Michelle Lai | Melissa Ann Lambert | Jeremiah La Torre | Aleve Mei Loh | Clarita Lulic | Leora Lutz | Yumiko Matsui | Douglas McNamee | Jon Measures | Adam D Miller | Hiroko Mitsui | Nobuki Mizumoto | Jun Miyazaki | Sae Moriyama | Shinnosuke Murakami | Masami Murao | Misato Nagare | Toshihiro Nagata | Alan Nakagawa | Eric Nakamura | Clary Newell | Tony Ng | Yumiko Nishizawa | Sayuri Noda | Emily Noguchi | Devon Oder | Kayoko Ohashi | Ruri Oinuma | Yasuko Okuno | Shinichi Ono | Yuji Orsuka | Syuzo Otsuka | Kazuyuki Ozonoe | Sara Pae | Linda Pollack | Kosta Potamianos | Max Presneill | Eron Rauch | Max Razdow | Gay Summer Sadow Rick | Christy Roberts | Karrie Ross | Catherine Ruane | Satoshi Saegusa | Toru Saegusa | Chigusa Saga | Samvel Saghatelian | Natsumi Sakatsuki | Chiaki Saito | Ray Sato | Rob Sato | Tomoaki Sato | Sonja Schenk | Lidia Shaddow | Nicolas Shake | Tomoaki Shibata | Mika Soma | RIccardo Spinotti | Satomi Suzuki | Sachi Takasugi | Kenji Tajiri | Mayumi Tanaka | Kyoco Taniyama | Ken Tatewaki | Ilan Terrell | Makoto Tomioka | Tamako Tomioka | Devon Tsuno | Eriko Uchiyama | Mike Vegas | Fred Verhoeven | Grant Vetter | Tetsuya Wakaume | Tessie Salcido Whitmore | Steven Wolkoff | Minoru Yamaguchi | Shin Yamasaki | Fujio Yamazaki | Mari Yanase | Will T. Yang | Yuji Yamashina | Michiko Yao | Akihiro Yasugi | Kouichiro Yoshio | Xiaowen Zhu | Essi Zimm
+ SUOMI-editio: Lotta Djupsund, Juha Allan Ekholm, Piritta Fors, Sade Kahra, Sirja Moberg, Soili Mustapää, Timo Saarelma 

Before Internet and email there were homing pigeons. These pigeons carried messages only one way, to their home. By placing their food at one location and their home at another location, pigeons learned to fly back and forth up to twice a day reliably becoming an important means of communication.

The importance of homing pigeons in the centuries before electronic communications, such as the telegraph and telephone, is seldom recognized. Pigeons carried photographic negatives, documents of breaking news and even medication between hospitals countries apart. 
As our means of communication developed into the present hyper-network, today's homing pigeons have retired from messengers and now trained as racing pigeons. It is thought that racing pigeons rely on the Earth's magnetic field to find their way home. Some evidence has surfaced indicating that mobile phone towers may be interrupting the birds navigation although no published research has investigated this theory.

The theme of this photography exhibit is an observation of the value of messaging; the sending, the expectations and the challenge of not expecting any return.

— Kio Griffith, curator


YHTEISTYÖ:
Kio Griffith, Los Angelesissä asuva, myös Japanissa toimiva kuraattori.www.kiogriffith.com
Ville Laaksonen, Turkulainen taiteilijakuraattori. www.laaksone.com
Valokuvakeskus Peri : www.peri.fi 
Kauppakeskus Forum: www.forumkortteli.fi/
Naantali Spa: www.naantalispa.fi

LISÄTIETOA:
Homing Pigeon : http://homing-pigeon4.tokyok.com/
Ville Laaksonen : ville.laaksonen@gmail.com / +358-503537071

 

 

 

Categories: exhibition

Artillery Magazine Review of Trophies

Posted on May 04, 2016

Artillery_logo41

Virginia Broersma, Pool Party Jitters, 2016

Virginia Broersma, Pool Party Jitters, 2016

VIRGINIA BROERSMA

The Lodge / Los Angeles

In fact, you can’t shrug it off even when Broersma paints a “bad” picture. There were several such grating, dissonant canvases in this latest exhibition, and there were knowingly sour passages in several other works as well. In these places—oddly angled brushstrokes in otherwise brilliantly executed pictures, for instance, or dark figures and objects modeled with a vigorous clumsiness—Broersma slips easily but dramatically from the virtuosic rendering that typifies her approach into something much harsher. Most painters with her skill set would find it almost impossible to compromise such a skill set so deftly and so nastily. But Broersma can—in great part because she needs to.

Broersma is clearly not about the meaning of the picture she’s painting so much as she is the meaning of the way it is painted. Even so, subject matter is no mere armature for her to hang a style on. Like her previous series of self-portraits, her brightly colored pictures of tumbling and cascading forms, which quickly (if never entirely) reveal themselves as body parts, treat the flesh with passionate ambivalence, finding limbs and torsi, skin and meat at once delightful and disgusting. Beholding these piles of sinew immediately inculcates you in the making of choices, however hypothetical: do I consume it or escape it? Do I consume it gustatorily or carnally? Where is the line between sex and food, anyway? Is what I’m fleeing not the presence before me but that very question?

Broersma’s technique, more than her imagery, triggers this inner debate. What she paints may or may not be considered luscious, but she paints it with an imposing lusciousness. She invites us to bite, or kiss, or flee, not her subjects but her paint—or, more accurately, she invites us to embrace her subjects precisely because they cannot be separated from the way they’ve been painted. Is she then extending to us a sense of what it’s like to delight in the act of painting? Not really. She’s extending to us the power of paint itself, a substance whose emphatic facture renders it almost exotic at this moment of digital (that is, flat-screened) ubiquity. Such a conflation of paint and flesh reclaims a tradition that goes back through Soutine, Courbet, Magnasco to Titian and the Venetian School. In our consumerist yet puritanical age, this tradition seems at once perverse and liberating—especially in Broersma’s hands.

 

 

Categories: press, text

We Choose Art | A Feminist Perspective

Posted on April 23, 2016

I am pleased to be included in this exhibition opening on May 21, 2016:

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Shoebox PR and We Choose Art are pleased to present We Choose Art | A Feminist Perspective 2.0! A group show hosted by guest curators Baha H. Danesh from We Choose Art and Kristine Schomaker of Shoebox PR. 

Join us on Saturday, May 21st at MUZEUMM and journey with us through eclectic fine art, photography, sculptures, video installations, and some FEMINIST PUNCH!

The exhibit will take place at 4817 W Adams Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90016

This is a FREE event and doors open at 7:00 PM and stay open until 11:00 PM.

Following We Choose Art’s philosophy of creating a collaborative community of artistic expression, this unique exhibition continues to document the vibrant and creative culture of modern feminist artists.

Curators Baha Danesh and Kristine Schomaker have created a two-week exhibition to expand on today’s modern feminists. They chose both male and female artists whose work continues the feminist dialogue of equality for all. The work presented spans over 40 years with a diversity of artists working in the Los Angeles area. The featured artists are showing works that deal with concepts of race, class, culture, politics, social commentary and representation of women.

Participating artists include: 

Austin Young
Baha Danesh
Bibi Davidson
Bill Pacak
Cathi Milligan
Chenhung Chen
Ching Ching Cheng
Daena Title
Deidre Sullivan-Beema
Diane Williams
Emilie Carroll
Gianni Arone
Irma Barbosa
Jenifer Yeuroukis
Keenan Chapan
Kelly Thompson
Kimberly Morris
Kristine Schomaker
Lena Moross
Morgan Green
Poline Shooshani
Sheli Silverio
Shula Singer Arbel
Victoria Sebanz
Virginia Broersma

Categories: exhibition

Virginia Broersma, Nick Brown and Kio Griffith selected for Emerging Curator Program at LACE

Posted on April 05, 2016

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Emerging Curators Explore the Ecstatic Moment of Transformation

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LACE announces its selection for the second Emerging Curators program, The Ecstasy of Mary Shelley, curated by Virginia BroersmaNick Brown and Kio Griffith. As Los Angeles’ premier experimental non-profit exhibition space, LACE created this program to discover and promote curatorial talent. The three curators have worked collaboratively since 2014. Their project was selected from a pool of 48 proposals that reflect the diversity of perspectives of the arts community. The jury comprised Helen Molesworth, MOCA chief curator, and artists Ken Gonzales-Day and Simon Leung. The exhibition will take place in January 2017.

This intriguing exhibition will feature work by artists who are inspired by the split second insight when transformation begins. The title alludes to the striking parallel between the moment when an idea hits and the moment life is conducted into Dr. Frankenstein’s monster in Mary Shelley’s tale. Whether employing media in alternative methods or toying with history through proxy languages, each of the artists works in a space of ecstatic conductivity, a state of flux. Their subjects include ecstatic religious experiences, Satori or enlightenment, transmogrification, race, gender and sexual identity.

According to juror Ken Gonzales-Day, “The Ecstasy of Mary Shelley was selected in keeping with LACE’s long history of providing the Los Angeles community with exhibitions that showcase the experimental, the political, and the provocative. Unlike other exhibitions that have considered the issues raised by borders and boundaries in explicitly physical or political terms, this exhibition will expand and complement such inquiries by foregrounding the generative force of transition itself. More poetic than prescriptive, the exhibition suggests that we consider anew those states that might have been historically characterized as “monstrous.” The curators have selected artists who consider mutations, riffs in identity, revolutionary moments, and ecstatic longing as transformed into precious and potentially liberatory moments of change. “

Virginia Broersma is an L.A.-based artist, writer and curator. Recent exhibitions include solo shows at The LODGE and Autonomie in L.A. and at Fermilab, the nation’s premier particle physics laboratory in Illinois.

Nick Brown is an L.A.-based artist and curator who was born in England. His work has been exhibited at galleries and museums nationwide, such as the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, and The Drawing Center, N.Y.

Kio Griffith is based in L.A. and Japan. He works as a visual and sound artist, independent curator, writer, and producer. He has exhibited in the U.K., Japan, Germany, Croatia, China, Hong Kong, Korea, Turkey, Belgium and the U.S.

Categories: exhibition, press

Digital Catalog for WEREWOLF

Posted on March 02, 2016

 

The digital catalog for WEREWOLF at Charlie James Gallery is now available on the gallery's website. The show runs through April 9th. 

 

WEREWOLF

CURATED BY NICK BROWN
FEBRUARY 27 - APRIL 9, 2016

Charlie James Gallery is delighted to present Werewolf – a group show curated by LA-based artist Nick Brown. The show features work by Alison Blickle, Virginia Broersma, Nick Brown, Kio Griffith, Josh Hagler, Ricardo Harris-Fuentes, Doug Harvey, Ben Jackel, Kim Kei, Laura Krifka, Robyn O’Neil, Maja Ruznic, and Dani Tull.

Performances by Mannlicher Carcano and Ohr will take place during the opening reception.

Werewolf explores the sublime through transformations. These transformations find expression through combinations of violence, nature, the sexual, the mystical and the political, and manifest in the show via painting, drawing, sculpture and photography. Emotional and physical transformations can be simultaneously terrifying and beautiful. This is the sublime – a moment of awakening. Transformation brought about through jarring experiences. The artists’ works in Werewolf confront the viewer with these conditions offering a catalyst for their own transformation.

About the show’s Curator:

Nick Brown is a Los Angeles based artist and curator. Born in England, Brown currently resides in Los Angeles and teaches in the Department of the Arts for UCLA Extension. His work has been exhibited at numerous galleries and museums nationwide, such as the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago (2002), The Drawing Center, NY, NY (2002), PS 122 in New York (2005), and the Torrance Art Museum (2014 & 2015). He has received grants from the California Institute of Contemporary Art, the Vermont Studio Center, where he also was awarded a residency and from Artadia in New York. Recent curatorial projects include Werewolf, an exhibition at Charlie James Gallery (February 2016).

Categories: exhibition, catalog

LA N CV 3 at the Coachella Valley Art Center

Posted on February 29, 2016

I am pleased to have three paintings included in LA N CV 3. 

Opening Reception: Saturday March 5, 2016 6-9pm
Coachella Valley Art Center, 45140 Towne St, Indio, California 92201

 

 Ready

LA n CV 3, curated by Mike McLain (MFA, Claremont 2010), is the third annual survey show of contemporary artists working in and around Los Angeles to be hosted by the Coachella Valley Art Center (www.coachellavalleyartcenter.org), located in old downtown Indio.

The show comprises works by 22 artists in painting, sculpture, installation, drawing, photography, video, new media, and performance, representing the wide range of media and disciplines that constitute contemporary art practice. 

Artistst: Virginia Broersma, Nathan Danilowicz, Yaron Dotan, Aaron Farley, Rema Ghuloum, Doty Glasco, Kio Griffith, Phillip Griswold, Cole James, Robert Larson, Jon Measures, Easton Miller, Thinh Nguyen, Harvey Opgenorth, Julie Orr, Kenton Parker, Dominic Quagliozzi, Brian Rochefort, Ana Rodriguez, Adam Stacey, Victoria Tao, Tessie Salcido Whitmore, Alison Woods

 

 

Categories: exhibition

UFOLOGY at Outpost Projects

Posted on February 29, 2016

Ufology

UFOLOGY
curated by Kio Griffith

Opening Reception:
March 19, 2016 
6-10PM

Outpost Projects
http://outpostprojects.org/current-exhibition
Joshua Tree, CA


Featuring works by artists- 
Nadege Monchera Baer
Bridget Beck
Virginia Broersma
Nick Brown
Gavin Bunner
Bryan Day
Mike Dee
Tom Dunn
Martin Durazo
Ariel Erestingcol
David French
Yvette Gellis
Rema Ghuloum
Eben Goff
Nathan Huff
Ichiro Irie
Kiel Johnson
Shoshi Kanokohata
Bessie Kunath
David Leapman
Jane Mulfinger
Nate Page
Sonja Schenk
Nicolas Shake
David Spanbock
Jesse Standlea
Tessie Salcido Whitmore
Lena Wolek
Steven Wolkoff

UFOLOGY, curated by Kio Griffith is a gathering of artists exploring territory, the space in between and it’s public definition devised as a plan, sketch, diagram, model or an experimental construction. It's about pioneering, exploration, and colonization. The surreal narrative premise is that a team of explorers (invited artists) will gather at base camp (Outpost Projects) where the Antarctic continent will land, displaced from current global warming conditions. The selected works may seem to emit supernaturalistic, otherworldly, futuristic, psychic overtones and will transfuse one or more of the five senses, flaring into synesthesia. 

“We don’t have a watertight definition of what a country is. Which as a geographer, is kind of shocking. The “Montevideo Convention” (1933) declares that to become a country, a region needs the following features: a defined territory, a permanent population, a government, and “the capacity to enter into relations with other states”. Yet many countries that meet these criteria aren‘t members of the United Nations (commonly accepted as the final seal of a country’s statehood). Consider Taiwan – which held a seat in the General Assembly until 1971, until mainland China entered and took over its position. Even the United Kingdom is a somewhat strange case, Middleton says. Within our law, England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland are considered individual states. We have our own sports teams and compete against each other – but we only have one shared seat in the UN. “So is England a country? By this criterion, no. 

The plight of the Lakota Sioux tribe began in the 18th Century, and by 1868 they had finally signed a deal with the US government that promised the right to live on the Black Hills. Unfortunately, they hadn’t accounted for a gold rush – and the government soon forgot about its deal as prospectors swarmed over the sacred land. The Lakota would have to wait more than a century for an apology, when, in 1998, a judge at the Supreme Court concluded that “a more ripe and rank case of dishonest dealings may never be found in our history”. 

Similar battles are being fought across every continent. There’s Barotseland, an African kingdom with a population of 3.5 million that has mounted a case to leave Zambia, and Ogoniland, which is attempting to disengage from Nigeria; both declared independence in 2012. In Australia, meanwhile, the Republic of Murrawarri was founded in 2013, after the indigenous tribe wrote a letter to Queen Elizabeth II asking her to prove her legitimacy to govern their land. The Murrawarri gave her 30 days to reply – and with nothing but a deafening silence, they formally reasserted their claim to rule their ancient homeland.

– excerpted from “An Atlas of Countries that Don’t Exist “ by Nick Middleton

Kio Griffith is a Los Angeles and Japan based visual and sound artist, independent curator, writer, and producer. His work includes drawing, painting, sound, video, performance, electronics, language, sculpture and installation. He has exhibited in the UK, Japan, Germany, Croatia, China, Hong Kong, Korea, Turkey, Belgium and the U.S. He has performed, collaborated or curated various musicians and contemporary artists, dancers and designers in galleries, museums, clubs and unconventional spaces, locally and internationally. His current projects include project director at TYPE (Tokyo+Yokohama Projects Exchange), curator and development director at ARTRA, associate editor at Fabrik and Artillery magazines, art director at Angel City Jazz Festival and has designed over 300 album jackets. Griffith was recently invited to exhibit in the 2016 Aichi Trienniale.

www.kiogriffith.com

 

 

 

Categories: exhibition

Werewolf at Charlie James Gallery

Posted on February 15, 2016

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WEREWOLF
CURATED BY NICK BROWN
FEBRUARY 27 - APRIL 9, 2016

ARTIST'S RECEPTION: FEBRUARY 27, 2016, 6-9PM


Charlie James Gallery is delighted to present Werewolf – a group show curated by LA-based artist Nick Brown. The show features work by Alison Blickle, Virginia Broersma, Nick Brown, Kio Griffith, Josh Hagler, Ricardo Harris-Fuentes, Doug Harvey, Ben Jackel, Kim Kei, Laura Krifka, Robyn O’Neil, Maja Ruznic, and Dani Tull.

Performances by Mannlicher Carcano and Ohr will take place during the opening reception.

Werewolf explores the sublime through transformations. These transformations find expression through combinations of violence, nature, the sexual, the mystical and the political, and manifest in the show via painting, drawing, sculpture and photography. Emotional and physical transformations can be simultaneously terrifying and beautiful. This is the sublime – a moment of awakening. Transformation brought about through jarring experiences. The artists’ works in Werewolf confront the viewer with these conditions offering a catalyst for their own transformation.

About the show’s Curator:

Nick Brown is a Los Angeles based artist and curator. Born in England, Brown currently resides in Los Angeles and teaches in the Department of the Arts for UCLA Extension. His work has been exhibited at numerous galleries and museums nationwide, such as the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago (2002), The Drawing Center, NY, NY (2002), PS 122 in New York (2005), and the Torrance Art Museum (2014 & 2015). He has received grants from the California Institute of Contemporary Art, the Vermont Studio Center, where he also was awarded a residency and from Artadia in New York. Recent curatorial projects include Werewolf, an exhibition at Charlie James Gallery (February 2016).

 

 

Categories: exhibition

"TROPHIES" - Solo exhibition at The LODGE

Posted on January 27, 2016

 

 

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1024 N. WESTERN AVE LOS ANGELES, CA 90029

 

VIRGINIA BROERSMA
TROPHIES

 
12th March –9th April 2016
Opening Reception: Saturday March 12th at 6:00–9:00 pm
Gallery Hours: Thursday–Saturday 12:00–6:00 pm and by appointment


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The LODGE is pleased to present “Trophies”, a solo exhibition of paintings by Virginia Broersma.

In this new series of work, Broersma mines her own personal history for the moments that shaped her perception of what was and wasn’t appropriate about the body. Fleshy forms twist and contort themselves into impossible arrangements, suggesting the lengths we go to in order to satisfy the expectations of others. In both literal and figurative terms, she considers the trophies she received and the aspects of herself they awarded. Then addressing the flip-side, several works in the show imply figures hiding their actions in tangled landscapes by moonlight. Ideas of reward, shame, presentation and taboos meander throughout the paintings, delving into what is showcased and what is hidden.

The representation of the human form has been a focus in Broersma’s work for the last several years. Past projects have included portraits of women exercising and paintings that stem from familiar art historical precedents such as bathers and reclining nudes. In all her projects, Broersma uses the human form to disrupt the power structures of the gaze and convention when it comes to the presentation of the body. Deviation and invention in the way she paints the figure act as tools with which she removes the normal cues for beauty and normalcy, allowing her to regain agency in how she presents the body.

Virginia Broersma graduated from SCAD (Savannah College of Art and Design) with a BFA in 2004.  She is now a Los Angeles based artist.  Recent exhibitions include a solo show at Autonomie, an artist run space in Los Angeles, and at Fermilab, the nation’s premier particle physics laboratory in Illinois.  Broersma’s works have been included in group exhibitions at the

Oceanside Museum of Art, the Riverside Art Museum and the Museum of Art and History in Southern California, as well as in Tokyo, Berlin, New York, and Chicago among other US and international cities. Broersma has been the recipient of several grants including funding from the California Institute of Contemporary Arts, the Puffin Foundation and was awarded a Community Arts Assistance Program grant from the City of Chicago, IL in both 2010 and 2011.

Please join us at The LODGE for the opening reception on Saturday March 12th from 6–9 pm.


For all inquiries, please contact Alice Lodge at +1 (323) 610-2022 or alice@thelodge.la

 

 

 

 

 

  

Categories: exhibition

SEXY XMAS at The Lodge

Posted on November 13, 2015
 
 
SEXY XMAS
1024 N. Western Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90029
 
Opening Reception: Thursday, December 3 6-9pm
 
Artists: Mark Acetelli, Megan Barnes, Virginia Broersma, Rodney Cinkin, Michael Lindsay-Hogg, Tim Isham, Alice Lodge, David McKay, Victoria Morris, Julio Panisello, Jimmy Thompson, Alison Veit and Jessika Wood

Unnamed

Categories: exhibition

Mortal Parts: Figures In the Abstract

Posted on October 01, 2015

 

Currently on view at The Green Art Gallery at Biola University in La Mirada, CA.

Opening recption: Tuesday September 22, 2015 6:30-8:30pm
Exhibition on view September 22 - October 14, 2015.
Artists: Virginia Broersma, Cathy Daley, Craig Taylor, Anna Von Mertens


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MORTAL PARTS features work by contemporary artists connected by a common practice of rendering the human (and anthropomorphic) form in an abstract way. 

Exploring the tension between figurative and abstract representation, MORTAL PARTS questions, expands, and materializes the intersection between our physical bodies and that which is immaterial, the body and the soul, the mortal and the immortal; This assembled body of work seeks to expand the field of figurative representation and explores the fragile space between the fleeting physical body and the immaterial, other matter that also constitutes our being.



 

Categories: exhibition

Keep Me In The Dark

Posted on September 13, 2015

 

Virginia Broersma

Keep Me In The Dark 
A solo pop-up exhibition at 350 Studio in Long Beach

 

Opening Reception: Saturday September 12, 6-9pm
Artist Reception: Thursday September 17, 6-9pm
Closing Day: Sunday September 20, 1-5pm

 

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Categories: exhibition

Art Collector Magazine - The Buzz in Bushwick

Posted on September 03, 2015

A nice little write up of the Hysterical Friction group exhibition at TSA NY, curated by Ichiro Irie of JAUS in Los Angeles. 

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By Jess Holburn 

From mid to late August, Manhattan goes into a state of torpor with many commercial galleries shut down in preparation for a flurry of September openings. Bushwick in Brooklyn, however, is ablaze with summer group shows. Transmitter NYC opened Each Ellipse Include a Point, a group show featuring Brooklyn based artists Janine Biunno, Emmy Mikelson and Parsley Steinweiss. Materially and conceptually, each artist draws attention to liminal relations between the perception of physical space and digital representations. 

Mikelson has exhibited nationally and internationally and recently received the Italian award for the 2014 Celeste Prize in Painting. She currently teaches in the fine and performing arts department at Baruch College, CUNY. Steinweiss’s work uses photography to play with ideas of illusion and imitation through the use of raw materials that are used in construction such as wood, marble and paper, serving to reveal its dual existence as image and object. Steinweiss has been featured in the Humble Arts Foundation’s 
The Collector’s Guide to Emerging Art Photography and written about in PDN’sEmerging Photographer magazine.

Biunno’s work addresses digital representations of architecture, infrastructure and density of urban space, primarily manifesting itself as prints, drawings, books and other works on paper. Biunno received her BFA from Carnegie Mellon University and MFA from Tufts University in conjunction with the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. The show overall has been positively received, with a great turnout for the opening, which resulted in one artwork sale of Biunno's prints, as well as the several sales of her accompanying zine, 
Future Systems.

Transmitter co-founder Sara Jones explains the impetus of the gallery: “Transmitter's goal is to feature diverse programming and a wide range of media, which allows for a more expanded market. We also look for a range and diversity geographically, often curating work from around the country and world.” 

Tiger Strikes Asteroid (TSA) is another Bushwick gallery with a similarly expansive outlook, comprising a network of artist-run spaces with locations also in Philadelphia and Los Angeles. Each space is independently operated and focuses on presenting a varied program of emerging and mid-career artists. “Our goal is to collectively bring people together, expand connections and build community through artist-initiated exhibitions and curatorial opportunities,” says TSA director Alex Paik.

The current show, 
Hysterical Friction: Works on Paper from JAUS LA is part of a two part exchange organized by ARTRA Curatorial and Ashley Garrett. For this show, JAUS took over the space and drew from their past several years of programming to curate an extensive works on paper show as a way of introducing their space to a New York audience. The opening was a great success, with several pieces sold and interest in several more. Whitehot Magazine will also be doing a writeup of the show.

Janine Biunno, Emmy Mikelson, Parsley Steinweiss, 
Each Ellipse Includes a Point shows at Transmitter, New York from 14 August to 13 September, 2015.

Hysterical Friction: Works on Paper from JAUS LA shows at Tiger Strikes Asteroid, New York from 14 August to 13 September, 2015. Artists include Carl Berg, Virginia Broersma, Nick Brown, Joseph Buckley, Anibal Catalan, Brian Chambers, Brian Cooper, Erin Dunn, Martin Durazo, Vick Garaventa, Aska Irie, Ichiro Irie, Kiel Johnson, Shiri Mordechay, Ruby Osorio, Alison Rash, Nathan Redwood, Devon Tsuno, Lena Wolek, Eve Wood and Davide Zucco. Creative Director, Irie Ichiro.

 

 

Hysterical Friction: Works on Paper From JAUS LA

Posted on August 05, 2015

 

The artist run gallery JAUS in LA is taking a group of Los Angeles based artists' works on paper to Tiger Strikes Asteroid (TSA) NY for an exhibition as part of the NY/LA exchange Trading Aces, organized by Artra Curatorial. I have two paintings on paper flying to NY for this exhibition. 

Opening Reception: Friday August 14, 6-10pm

 

Tsa

Left to right: David Zucco, Erin Dunn, Nick Brown, Martin Durazo

 

Hysterical Friction: Works on Paper from JAUS LA 
August 14 – September 13, 2015
Opening Friday, August 14, 6-9pm

TSA New York is pleased to present Hysterical FrictionWorks on Paper from JAUS LA. This is the first part of the Trading Aces project organized by ARTRA and Ashley Garrett – TSA New York will be exhibiting at JAUS in the fall.

Artists as curators, curators as artists, artists exhibiting their work for the first time, artists exhibiting their work for the zillionth time; such has been the profile of those who have either shown or organized shows at JAUS, Los Angeles. As an introduction for this artist-run space to the art community in New York, founder and director Ichiro Irie, has organized the group exhibition Hysterical Friction showcasing works by more than 20 artists.  

How does one go about encapsulating six years of programming that has included everything from small drawings to large scale installations by well over 300 artists from all 6 continents without having a huge museum-like space and an extravagant budget? The quick and easy answer is that you can’t and you don’t. Nevertheless, out of a desire to give visitors some sense of what JAUS is all about, Hysterical Friction brings together, with a few exceptions, mostly LA artists who have previously shown at JAUS in the form of a works on paper exhibition.

Also featured are a few New York residents such as RISD & Rutgers alum, Erin Dunn; Davide Zucco who just had a solo show at NURTUREart, and recent Yale MFA grad Joseph Buckley. Also included are former New York residents Nick Brown, Shiri Mordechay, and Nathan Redwood.

Taken as a whole, the show attempts to exemplify the diversity of talent that JAUS has become known for with works ranging from the very minimal and conceptual to the very baroque and visceral. The contrasts created by the juxtaposition of so many disparate approaches in such proximity might create for a somewhat manic and jarring experience; an experience that will hopefully stimulate a dynamic and unexpected reading of each individual work.

Artists included in the exhibition are Carl Berg, Virginia Broersma, Nick Brown, Joseph Buckley, Anibal Catalan, Brian Chambers, Brian Cooper, Erin Dunn, Martin Durazo, Vick Garaventa, Aska Irie, Ichiro Irie, Kiel Johnson, Shiri Mordechay, Ruby Osorio, Alison Rash, Nathan Redwood, Devon Tsuno, Lena Wolek, Eve Wood and Davide Zucco.

Categories: exhibition

Young & Restless

Posted on August 04, 2015

 

I have two paintings included in this group exhibition curated by art critic Evan Senn. I hope you can join us for the opening at Display in Anaheim.

Opening reception is Sunday August 9th, 2-6pm

 

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An exhibition that explores the gifted, diligent, rising female stars in Orange County's booming art scene. Whether connected through location, collectives, friendships, collaborations or exhibitions, these women have created a strong artistic community amongst themselves, finding strength and passion together.

Featuring art by Suzanne Walsh , Sydney Walters, Joy Shannon, Katie Perdue, Michelle Orozco, Erin Metzdorf Catalano, Patti McCandless, Diana Markessinis, Jennifer King, Jinx, Diana Corpus, Annie Compean, Tea Cake, Anna Brittell, Sarah Elise Abramson, Elisa Ang, and Virginia Broersma, we will be celebrating the evocative work of these talented artists, and exploring the artistic expression prevalent in this unique community.

Curated by art critic Evan Senn, the opening reception for "Young & Restless" will take place on Sunday, August 9, 2015, from 2-6pm, and will include live musical performances by Joy Shannon and Taylor Crawford. 

"Surrounded by countless hurdles, competition and the nonstop patriarchy in the arts, young female artists have a tough time making a name for themselves, a tough time finding recognition, respect and opportunities. Being on the orange side of the Southern California artistic landscape doesn't help too much either. Los Angeles is bustling with art and opportunity, forcing artists to fight their way to the top of the art food chain, stepping over others like dead bodies in a zombie apocalypse. The young women persevering through it all are graced with talent and determination, kindness and community, against all the odds in front of them. Talent is one thing that is not a hurdle for the young and restless female artists of Orange County." -Evan Senn, July 2015

About the Curator
Evan is the Editor-In-Chief of Inland Empire Weekly, Culture Magazine, Assistant Editor for YAY! LA Mag, and owns and operates the independent online art journal, Rogue Arts. She has an M.A. in Art History and is a Curator, Artist, Designer, Editor and Writer. She has contributed as an arts writer for KCET Artbound, OC Art Blog, OC Register, OCR Magazine, Artillery Magazine, Local Arts, Beauty & Wellness Magazine, Laika, Unite4:Good, and E-VOLVED Magazine. Past publications also include ArtScene, Juxtapoz, and Art Ltd. She has curated art exhibitions at The Egan Gallery, F+ Gallery, CSUF East Gallery, Loyola Marymount University student galleries, and Q Art Salon.


Janice Lowry "Constructions"
As a counterpoint to the women in "Young & Restless" we are presenting an installation of "constructions" by Janice Lowry. Janice maintained a studio in Orange County from the early 80's until her premature death in 2009. We are proud to present a collection of some of her best works. 

Please join us on Sunday, August 9, from 2-6 PM and see some great art, have some fresh locally brewed beer, good wine and snacks! We would love to see you!



"The question isn't who's going to let me; it's who is going to stop me."
-Ayn Rand

"The way in which we think of ourselves has everything to do with how our world see us and how we see ourselves successfully acknowledged by the world."
-Arlene Rankin

Categories: exhibition

Gallery shots of After Eden group exhibition

Posted on July 24, 2015

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Categories: exhibition

AFTER EDEN a recommended show in July

Posted on July 15, 2015

Artinla

 

After Eden is a one-night group exhibition featuring works by a select group of artists who agreed to depart from conventional portrayals of the human form in an attempt to illuminate the body in unfamiliar ways that read intimate yet complex. Curated by Durden and Ray, After Eden features works by Tanya Batura, Virginia Broersma, Michelle Carla Handel, Tom Dunn, David French, Liz Nurenberg, Cindy Rehm, Julia Schwartz, Kiki Seror, Meghan Smythe and Joey Wolf. After Eden will be open to the public on July 18 from 6 pm until 10 pm at MuzeuMM, located at 4817 West Adams Boulevard in Los Angeles.

Categories: press

AFTER EDEN

Posted on June 29, 2015

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After Eve and Adam were expelled from the Garden of Eden, they were faced with the awareness of their bodies. Shame, transgression, the stigma from nakedness and an impulse to hide were introduced to their lives. The artists in AFTER EDEN each work with the body in various ways. They poke and prod at the trappings of our skin and our flesh, which are entangled in symbolism and our own associations and stories. How image is created, how the body is understood and received, how we use our own bodies and how we share in agency with others’ bodies are all questions considered.

The art presented departs from conventional portrayals of the human form and image. These works allude to the body in unfamiliar ways that are often intimate and complex. There is an undercurrent of what the body can symbolize in terms of identity, the self, one's psychology and how these change when associated with an other. Transgression and transcendence, the abject and the seductive, beauty and the grotesque are all intermingled — their borders confused and overlapping. 

Please join us from 6 to 10 p.m. July 18 for the one-night reception and special performances by Bombshell Fire Entertainment. Viewings are available by appointment July 20 to 24, 2015.  

MuzeuMM
4811 West Adams 
Los Angeles, CA 90016 
http://muzeumm.com/

Curated by Durden & Ray 
http://durdenandray.com/

Categories: exhibition

FROM THE BARRICADES at Kreuzberg Pavillon, Berlin

Posted on June 15, 2015

I am pleased to be included in this group exhibition in Berlin on June 27, 2015. 

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Categories: exhibition

Essay on Tina Linville for TRANSFORM Exhibition Catalog

Posted on May 22, 2015

In the fall of 2014, I was invited to write the catalog essay on the work of Tina Linville for the TRANSFORM exhibition at the Green Gallery at Biola University. The catalog is completed and available to read on ISSUU.

Transform

 

 

Categories: writing

be-Art Magazine - Emerging Selection: LA Artist Virginia Broersma

Posted on May 20, 2015

Be_art

Whether it is on paper or on canvas, the gesture is quite impressive. This young artist has something to say for sure. She would be the combination of Willem de Kooning and Annette Messager. Willem de Kooning for the strong gesture – probably due to the similar Dutch origin? -. There’s no hesitation on the canvas, each brush stroke plays like a sentence that would demonstrate a purpose. And combination with French artist Annette Messager for the audacity to explore the complexity of female intimacy. Broersma is leaving progressively the representational to lead us to another narrative both more sensual and more violent. Very strong! an artist to follow, BCh

 

See the full post at be-Art Magazine.
 
 

 

Categories: press

CALIFORNIA DREAMING at the Riverside Art Museum

Posted on May 04, 2015

This is the final stop for the exhibition California Dreaming, which has traveled to Italy, then to the Oceanside Museum of Art, and now finally will be exhibited at the Riverside Art Museum. 

Reception: Thursday, May 7, 2015 6-8pm

Californiadreamingopening

Categories: exhibition

WE Show at WE Labs

Posted on April 16, 2015

I am pleased to be included in this exhibition at WE Labs in Long Beach. Work Evolution Laboratories (WE Labs) is Downtown Long Beach's first coworking community: an inspiring environment designed for innovators and influencers. 

Opening reception: May 2, 2015 6:30pm; RSVP here.

 

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Categories: exhibition, event

The Telephone Game

Posted on April 01, 2015

at Prohibition Gallery in Culver City

Opening Reception: April 11, 2015 6-10pm

I worked on a collaborative piece for this exhibition with Nick Brown, Anne-Elizabeth Sobieski and Essi Zimm. The final piece will be seen for the first time at the opening reception. 

Teleophone

Categories: exhibition, event

Homing Pigeon: edition 4 KYOTO

Posted on March 27, 2015

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TYPE (Tokyo+Yokohama Projects) presents


Homing Pigeon : Edition 4: Kyoto
伝書鳩:其の四・京都編

group photo exhibit

curated by Kio Griffith

EXHIBIT RUNS: APRIL 4 - 12, 2015


FREE ADMISSION

GALLERY ANTENNA
Masuda Bldg. 2D, 215-6 Nakakanabutsu-cho, Gojou Hirokawa Higashi Hairu, Shimogyo-ku,
KYOTO, JAPAN 

〒600-8332
京都府京都市下京区五条堀川東入ル中金仏町215-6
増田屋ビル2階D
水曜日から土曜日、12:00-19:00

http://www.antenna-re.info/

supported by
MOPLA 
AX3 American Aperture Awards 
Photo Contemporary / Photo Independent

......................................................................

featuring:
Hiromichi Akahane | Naoko Akiyama | Douglas Alvarez | Ismael de Anda III | Michael Arata | Carmen Argote | Yajuro Bando | Terri Berman | Virginia Broersma | Nick Brown | Gul Cagin | Ako Castuera | Sean Chao | Sijia Chen | Sally Coates | Emily Counts |Sydney Croskery | Ludmil Dimitrov | Veronica Duarte | Tom Dunn | Mark Dutcher | Shigenori Ebata | Aya Niibo Edamoto | Doug Eisenstark | Gabriel Escalante | Bill Farroux | Roni Feldman | Jon Flack | Shingo Francis | David French | Sarajo Frieden | Tatsuya Fukunaga | Rema Ghuloum | Aaron Giesel | Allen D Glass II | Mat Gleason | Dean Gojobori | Audra Graziano | Michelle Carla Handel | Doug Harvey | Shisei Hashimura | Jun Hiraoka | Lusine Hovsepian | Bryan Ida | Mari Inukai | Aska Irie | Ichiro Irie | Yoko Irino | Yayoi Itami | Masaaki Iwama | Tomoyuki Iwanami | William Kaminski | Kazumi Kashimura | Virginia Katz | Ayumi Kikuchi | Phil Kim | Kohl King | Celia Ko | Juri Koll | Norichika Koyama | Minako Kumagai | Gil Kuno | Masumi Kuramochi | Michelle Lai | Melissa Ann Lambert | Jeremiah La Torre | Aleve Mei Loh | Leora Lutz | Yumiko Matsui | Douglas McNamee | Jon Measures | Adam D Miller | Hiroko Mitsui | Nobuki Mizumoto | Jun Miyazaki | Sae Moriyama | Shinnosuke Murakami | Masami Murao | Misato Nagare | Toshihiro Nagata | Alan Nakagawa | Eric Nakamura | Clary Newell | Tony Ng | Yumiko Nishizawa | Sayuri Noda | Emily Noguchi | Devon Oder | Kayoko Ohashi | Ruri Oinuma | Yasuko Okuno | Shinichi Ono | Yuji Orsuka | Syuzo Otsuka | Kazuyuki Ozonoe | Sara Pae | Linda Pollack | Kosta Potamianos | Max Presneill | Eron Rauch | Max Razdow | Gay Summer Sadow Rick | Christy Roberts | Karrie Ross | Catherine Ruane| Satoshi Saegusa | Toru Saegusa | Chigusa Saga | Samvel Saghatelian | Natsumi Sakatsuki | Chiaki Saito | Ray Sato | Rob Sato | Tomoaki Sato | Sonja Schenk | Lidia Shaddow | Nicolas Shake | Tomoaki Shibata | Mika Soma | RIccardo Spinotti | Satomi Suzuki | Sachi Takasugi | Kenji Tajiri | Mayumi Tanaka | Ken Tatewaki | Ilan Terrell | Makoto Tomioka | Tamako Tomioka | Devon Tsuno | Eriko Uchiyama | Mike Vegas | Fred Verhoeven | Tetsuya Wakaume | Steven Wolkoff | Minoru Yamaguchi | Shin Yamasaki | Fujio Yamazaki | Mari Yanase | Will T. Yang | Yuji Yamashina | Michiko Yao | Akihiro Yasugi | Kouichiro Yoshio | Xiaowen Zhu | Essi Zimm and more…

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いまのようにインターネットやemailが発達する以前、伝書鳩(ハト)は重要な通信手段だった。小さく巻いた写真や書類を足に付けた伝書鳩は世界のニュースを伝えていたが、現代ではレース鳩としての役割だけが残った。

レースに参加した鳩の、鳩舎に帰ってくる羽数を帰還率という。その帰還率が全体的に年々悪くなっており、レースによっては全滅するレースも発生しているという。その原因は近年の通信・放送網の拡大で、基地局や携帯の電磁波が多くなり、鳩の方向感覚を狂わせているからだという説もある。

いまは、連絡の手段が豊富で容易なだけに、返信をもらうことが当たり前のような風潮だが、この充実した通信手段が狂ったらどうなるのだろう。
もう少しだけ、送る相手への気持ちを意識する。それだけで、何かが確実に変わる予感がする。
今回の写真展のテーマは「返事が要らないメッセージ」です。

Before Internet and email there were homing pigeons. These pigeons carried messages only one way, to their home. By placing their food at one location and their home at another location, pigeons learned to fly back and forth up to twice a day reliably becoming an important means of communication. 

The importance of homing pigeons in the centuries before electronic communications, such as the telegraph and telephone, is seldom recognized. Pigeons carried photographic negatives, documents of breaking news and even medication between hospitals countries apart. 
As our means of communication developed into the present hyper-network, today's homing pigeons have retired from messengers and now trained as racing pigeons. It is thought that racing pigeons rely on the Earth's magnetic field to find their way home. Some evidence has surfaced indicating that mobile phone towers may be interrupting the birds navigation although no published research has investigated this theory. 

The theme of this photography exhibit is an observation of the value of messaging; the sending, the expectations and the challenge of not expecting any return.

- KG

Categories: exhibition

MAS 8: San Diego

Posted on February 20, 2015

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www.artrala.org
http://www.sandiego-art.org/

Categories: exhibition, event

MAS 7: Santa Monica

Posted on December 04, 2014

Mas

Categories: exhibition, event

CALIFORNIA DREAMING opening reception

Posted on December 04, 2014

Opening Reception at the Oceanside Museum of Art: Saturday December 6, 2014 6-9pm 

 Yellowcrunch

Oceanside Museum of Art Proudly Announces

“California Dreaming: An International Portrait of Southern California”

 

The Oceanside Museum of Art (OMA) is proud to announce its inaugural venture into international traveling exhibitions. California Dreaming: An International Portrait of Southern California is a comprehensive traveling exhibition juried by Peter Frank (Los Angeles-based art critic/curator), Drew Oberjuerge (Inland Empire-based museum director), and Daniel Foster (San Diego/Oceanside-based museum director).  The exhibition is a contemporary look at the state of the “California Dream” interpreted by 54 artists from California and beyond. Also available with the traveling exhibition is a quality catalog publication of the 54 chosen artworks.

California Dreaming: An International Portrait of Southern California will travel to three top museum/gallery venues over the next year: the Palazzo della Provincia di Frosinone in Frosinone, Italy (Rome vicinity) under the leadership of Alfio Borghese, Gallery Director, October 4 - 28, 2014; Oceanside Museum of Art (OMA), December 6, 2014 - March 29, 2015; and Riverside Art Museum (RAM), April 21 - July 2, 2015. OMA has arranged for a cultural delegation of nearly two dozen to travel to Italy from October 20-29, 2014 in support of this one–year international traveling exhibition.  A major public reception for California Dreaming will occur at OMA on Saturday, December 6, 2014 from 6-8 p.m.

“We are very excited about the ambitious vision and high quality of art and artists selected for this extensive traveling international exhibition.  I think this exhibition has been interpreted by the three jurors in a very contemporary and updated manner that directly challenges the nostalgic and romantic mid-20th Century notions of the ‘California Dream’,” says Daniel Foster, executive director of the Oceanside Museum of Art.

Out of the 900 juried art submissions, the selected artists for the California Dreaming exhibition are:  Sharon Allicotti, Craig Attebery, Alexsandra Babic, Vincenzo Balsamo, Lisa Bartleson, Olivia Bouchard, Virginia Broersma, Lorraine Bubar, JT Burke, Craig Deman, James Doolin, Jorg Dubin, Kari Dunham, John Eden, Michael Field, Star Foreman, Carlene Frances, Kenda Francis, Steven Gibson, Dirk Hagner, Bradley Hankey, Brooke Harker, Teale Hatheway, Danny Heller, Carolyn Hesse-Low, Bryan Ida, Seta Injeyan, Glenna Jennings, Yoichi Kawamura, Roy Kerchhoffs, Mary-Austin Klein, Gary Lang, Dan McCleary, Douglas McCulloh, Allan Morrow, Hung Viet Nguyen, R. Mike Nichols, Fiona Pattinson, Kim Reasor, Lara Jo Regan, Jeremie Riggleman, Junn Roca, Karrie Ross, Catherine Ruane, Gwen Samuels, Cory Sewelson, Barbara Sexton, Gregg Stone, Nicole Strasburg, Young Summers, Daena Title, Jen Trute, Cynda Valle, and Donna Westerman. 

Categories: exhibition, event

DRAGNET

Posted on December 03, 2014

Dragnet

Categories: exhibition, event

LA Art Auction to Benefit Syrian Refugees

Posted on November 20, 2014

I have donated a painting to this benefit organized by LA artist Josh Atlas. 

When: Thursday, November 20, 2014, 6-9pm

Where: Angel City Brewery, 216 S Alameda St, Los Angeles, California 90012

All money raised will be donated directly to Oxfam.  More details on the event and how raised funds are used to provide critical humanitarian aid can be found here:

https://my.oxfamamerica.org/fundraise?fcid=365168

Oxfam

 

 

Categories: event

Images from the Yokohama + Tokyo Triennial

Posted on November 20, 2014

Images courtesy of Kio Griffith.

Draftpunk 2: carbon footprint
@ Mid Tokyo Gallery 
2nd Floor, 7-4-14 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 
東京都港区六本木7-4-14 2F
OCT 25 - NOV 1

Nadege Monchera Baer, Virginia Broersma, Gul Cagin, Kristin Calabrese, Daniela Campins, Brian Cooper, Emily Counts, Kenturah Davis, Michael Dee, Mark Dutcher, Jenny Hager, Josh Hagler, Rema Ghuloum, Kumiko Kubota, Kiel Johnson, Marion Lane, Jason Manley, Cleon Peterson, Christopher Russell, Charlie Schneider , Junichi Seki, Marie Thibeault, Akihiro Yasugi, Takeshi Watanabe, Dorian Wood

 Midtokyo_gallery

Mid_tokyo

Mid_tokyo_close_up

 

Million Year Picnic 
@ Gallery Fu 
1-31-9 Ishikawa-cho, Naka-ku, Yokohama 
横浜市中区石川町1-31-9
OCT 28 - NOV 2

Lisa Adams, Joshua Aster, Carmen Argote, Nick Brown, Chelsea Dean , Lisa DeSmidt, Paul Gillis, Jane Hugentober, Myungwon Kim , Esmeralda Montes, Jayme Odgers, Owen Schmit, Chris Trueman

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Categories: exhibition

365 Artists, 365 Days

Posted on October 28, 2014

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I was recently featured on this online project. Check it out here.

 

 

 

 

 

Categories: press

i:23 - Yokohama Triennial 2014

Posted on October 20, 2014

I am please to have three paintings included in i:23, which is an international exchange between emerging contemporary art spaces in Tokyo / Yokohama and Los Angeles. ARTRA Curatorial has partnered with TYPE [Tokyo+Yokohama Projects Exchange] to bring this multi venue event to both cities - October in Tokyo and Yokohama with visiting Japanese artists coming June 2015 to Los Angeles.

Triennial


curatorial direction by Kio Griffith 
co-curated by Yuko Wakaume and Shingo Francis 

www.artrala.org
http://tokyok.com/

The theme of 2014 Yokohama Triennial is
“Art Fahrenheit 451: Lost Sea at the center of Earth”
taking Ray Bradbury’s dystopian sci-fi classic, Fahrenheit 451 about the relevance of information fidelity of memory and transgressing culture.

The analogous theme of the Los Angeles - Tokyo/Yokohama exchange project, “i:23.” takes the iconic number 23, i.e. 23 kilogram capacity per luggage to pack a show in, 23 chromosomes to define DNA, the earth revolving at a 23 degree angle… looking into the relevance of identity, value, material and modern myths.

Artists make art, and galleries exhibit art. In other parts of our cities run artist spaces and alternative spaces anticipating activation. Spanning two cities and a large body of water, i:23 explores the worlds of 18 art spaces in Tokyo / Yokohama and Los Angeles. 

By pairing galleries and creating the opportunity to exchange both their artists and their spaces, i:23 will present exhibitions in Japan (October 2014) and in Los Angeles (June 2015) showcasing a deep cross section of current practice from the two cities.

Each space will present a curated exhibition comprising both visiting artists and their ‘local’ or represented artists, with an emphasis to include work by those who run the spaces.
________________________________

TOKYO
Here There Be Tygers @ Gallery Lara Tokyo.
Draftpunk 2 / carbon footprint @ Mid-Tokyo Gallery.
From The Dust Returns @ Ichibeicho Gallery

YOKOHAMA
Best Of Possible Worlds @ Art Baboo 146.
Million Year Picnic @ Gallery Fu
I See You Never @ Launch Pad Gallery.
There Will Come Soft Rains @ Zaim Cafe Annex.
Homing Pigeon 3 : Yokohama @ Nitehi Works.
Body Electric.@ Sakura Works.

東京
Here There Be Tygers 
@ Gallery Lara Tokyo.
- ネオダダ・ネオフルクサスの構想をジャンプ台に弾けだされた作品集
Draftpunk 2 / carbon footprint @ Mid-Tokyo Gallery.
- 鉛筆技から生まれるドローイングのコンセプトを多彩なメディアで紹介する
From The Dust Returns 
@ 市兵衛町画廊
- コンテンポラリー・ランドスケープ展

横浜
Best Of Possible Worlds
@ Art Baboo 146.
- てのひら規模の小宇宙
Million Year Picnic
@ Gallery and Cafe Fu
- 21世紀末後のロマン派グループ展
I See You Never @ Launch Pad Gallery.
- アイデンティティの豹変が激しい現代のポートレート展
There Will Come Soft Rains 
@ Zaim Cafe Annex.
- 歴史、モダンアート、哲学、レトロのリミックス作品集
Homing Pigeon 3 : Yokohama @ Nitehi Works.
- 「返事がいらないメッセージ」写真100人+展
Body Electric.@ Sakura Works.



Categories: exhibition

The Great Wrong Place

Posted on October 06, 2014

at NORTE MAAR, as part of EXHANGE RATES: The Bushwick Expo, New York 

I will have a piece included in the group exhibition - The Great Wrong Place - that will be Los Angeles based Durden and Ray's contribution to an international exchange happening in 24 Bushwick galleries. 

Great_worng

NORTE MAAR
83 Wyckoff Avenue, #1B, Brooklyn, NY 11237

October 23-26 2014

Artists included in exhibition: 
Virginia Broersma
Nick Brown
Emily Counts
Tom Dunn
Ariel Erestingcol
Roni Feldman
Jon Flack
David French
Kio Griffith
Jenny Hager
Raymie Iadevaia
Gil Kuno
Michelle Jane Lee
Esmeralda Montes
Max Presneill
Grant Vetter
Steven Wolkoff

curated by David French

NORTE MAAR
83 Wyckoff Avenue, #1B, Brooklyn, NY 11237
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A catalog was also produced for the exhibition: 

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Los Angeles has long been a place that has drawn outcasts, opportunists and creative types who have escaped one life to re-invent themselves in another. When talking about the Los Angeles of the crime writer Raymond Chandler, W.H. Auden referred to the city as “the great wrong place”. In one respect the sheer blandness of LA while acting as a blank canvas on which many have re-shaped their own destiny also acts as a mask covering up the more gritty and seedy elements that it is so adept at harboring. In another sense the glitz and glamour of LA’s Hollywood media machine has also acted as a mask that has hid not only the real story of America’s sordid history and present but continues to overshadow the contribution made by contemporary artists in what is becoming a major hub of art creation in the United States. 

All the Artists in Durden and Ray in one way or another attempt to tap into a certain sense of disquiet while maintaining an affirmative visual sensibility. There is an unsettled undercurrent within our work which binds us together as a group of artists and yet the positive nature of our work and our personalities generates visually exciting and thought provoking work and exhibitions. Perhaps this aspect of our work or our way of thinking has been affected by living in Los Angeles or perhaps this is what brought us together in the first instance to Los Angeles. The great wrong place is perhaps a fitting moniker for a city whose superficial image belies a veritable army of vital culture creators. — David French 

.....................................

About Exchange Rates.
Exchange Rates is an international exposition of artworks and art galleries in and around Bushwick. Conceived and produced by arts organizations helmed by artists and curators in Bushwick and London, UK, Exchange Rates—known also in this inaugural iteration as The Bushwick Expo—is an international exposition of artworks and curatorial programs in which host spaces in one art community open their doors and share their walls with kindred spaces on visit from elsewhere. It is an exposition, to wit. Not a fair.

Date of the exposition are October 23-26. Spaces will be open daily from 12-6pm. A special edition of Norte Maar’s Beat Nite will be held on Friday, October 24 from 6-10pm and will feature an after party at the new Vazquez, 10-12am.

Some exhibits will be integrated, some collaborative yet autonomous, some even spontaneous or virtual.

The rates of exchange, as such, will fluctuate, while the currencies of exchange—ideas and culture—remain fixed.

Shared spaces and cultural currencies. Currencies tangible and intangible.

Variable valuations of the same.

Visit one space to visit several.

Visit Bushwick to get a glimpse of aesthetic endeavors both here and in a dozen other cities.

Come to Exchange Rates for a creative breath of fresh air.

http://sluice.info/bushwick

Categories: exhibition, event

Catalog for DITHYRAMBIC

Posted on October 04, 2014

Catalog Release Party: October 4, 2014  4-6pm at Autonomie

The catalog is here! I will have a limited number of copies available at the catalog release for $10, and once those are gone they can be ordered online through Blurb.

 

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Categories: exhibition, event

Exhibition Shots of DITHYRAMBIC

Posted on September 16, 2014

at AUTONOMIE PROJECTS

 

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All photography by Brian Thomas Jones

Categories: exhibition

Opening Reception of DITHYRAMBIC

Posted on September 16, 2014

September 13, 2014

Autonomie Projects, Los Angeles, CA

Opening_8 Opening_7Opening_5Opening_4Opening_3Opening_1Opening_2

Categories: exhibition, event

DITHYRAMBIC - Solo show

Posted on August 26, 2014

at AUTONOMIE PROJECTS

 

I am pleased to announce my solo exhibition DITHYRAMBIC at Autonomie Projects. 

Opening reception: Saturday, September 13, 2014, 7-10pm

Autonomie is located at: 4742 West Washington Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90016

https://goo.gl/maps/2BDhb

Iseewhatyoumean_small

Please Join us Saturday, September 13th from 7-10pm for the solo exhibition of Virginia Broersma in the Main Gallery and new works by Becca Shewmake in the Project Room. 

MAIN GALLERY

Virginia Broersma: Dithyrambic

The paintings of Broersma occupy an enigmatic space where anthropomorphic gestures collide with classical genre painting. Her bent, twisted and twirling forms weave the figure and the environment together into a seamless pictorial event. Executed in a manner that is both haptic and subtle, Broersma's painterly vocabulary mixes a reserved sensualism with dithyrambic operations. As such, her unique take on classical themes like 'the bathers' and 'the odalisque' challenge not only traditional ideas of beauty and design, but they explore the shifting space between figurative naturalism and the (post-)modern preoccupation with formlessness.

As such, Broersma's work avoids being read as a display of figurative pathos or another return to painterly 'heroism'. Instead, her images develop a dialectics of dissonance based on revealing and concealing, veiling and unveiling, determined mark marking and improvisational actions. These dynamic qualities, which represent forms coming in and out of being, also reveal a second set of questions concerning the phenomenal quality of what is being pictured. That is to say, a closer reading of Broersma's images quickly reveals a 'catalog' of pictures that stand twice removed from the subjects they portray. Of course, this is the case not only because painting is always already a form of mediation, but because the subjects in her source material hint at museum lighting techniques and the staged quality of the cultural imaginary in the era of hyper-mediation.

By making us aware of the split between the affect of 'staging' and the rhetoric of display, Broersma's work asks us to question not just how we think about classical themes as a reflection of socio-political and gendered interests, but also how iconic images are constructed as a total experience that extends well beyond the confines of what is 'pictured'. In other words, it is not just the aura of the image that serves as the raw material for Broersma's art practice, but rather, an engagement with the very techniques that are used to produce the 'quality' of the iconic for public consumption.

Thus, Broersma is not just another history painter of sorts, or someone who is interested in painting figurative morphologies, even though both of these concerns are central to her art practice. Rather, what we find at play in Broersma's imagery, beyond a certain painterly opulence, is that her images court an indefinable space that consists of endless questions about canonical works and their conditions of presentment. This paradoxical doublebind - of reworking historical or academic themes in order to make them more porous and less identifiable - is what gives Broersma's project a unique sense of purchase in the contemporary moment.

Composed of inerrant indices of the iconographic, her paintings work to reconfigure the status attributed to the image as a cultural artifact by directly addressing the crisis of terminal metastasis known as pluralism. Not only that, but Broersma's oeuvre challenges the cult-like 'status' of the image by sampling techniques and imagery from the most over-determined styles of picture making and then making- them-over into new models of plastic expression.

What we witness in such moments is the apotheosis of the 'grand manner' as it becomes subject to the mutations of improvisation over and against the auratic techniques of exhibition design as well as the 'quality' of mechanical and/or digital reproduction. Most importantly however, Broersma's work takes up this position as a process of open-ended play, providing a polyvalent reading of history painting that is a rare and honest achievement in a period of art production that often derides the codex of historical themes as retrograde or simply démodé. In Broersma's theater of pictorial pleasures, the themes of modernity take on a new vitality, not just for engaging with the past, but for opening up new avenues in thinking about the pictorial problematic in the early twenty-first century.

autonomieprojects.com

Categories: text

California Dreaming

Posted on August 21, 2014

An International Portrait of Southern California

I am pleased to announce that my painting, "Yellow Crunch" has been selected to be included in the three part traveling exhibition organized by the Oceanside Museum of Art. The exhibition will begin in Tuscany, and then return later in the year to Southern California. 

 Yellowcrunch

1. Palazzo della Provincia di Frosinone, Frosinone, Italy, October 4 – 28, 2014

2. Oceanside Museum of Art, Oceanside CA, December 6, 2014 – March 29,      2015

3. Riverside Art Museum, Riverside, CA, April 21 – July 5, 2015

Categories: exhibition

Thanks For The Mammaries

Posted on July 18, 2014

I will have a painting included in this exhibition and fundraiser to support breast cancer research at ForYourArt in Los Angeles, CA.

Thanksformammaries_invite

Organized by Bettina Hubby, in partnership with Klowden Mann

Opening Reception: July 31, 2014 7-9pm

Exhibition runs July 31 - August 17, and over 100 artists will have works in the show, many of which will be for sale to raise money for breast cancer research. 

 

Read an article about Bettina Hubby on LA WEEKLY and read Virginia's interview with her on A STUDIO AFFAIR.

 

Categories: exhibition, event

(Stay Tuned)

Posted on July 17, 2014

Details regarding my upcoming Solo Show in September at AUTONOMIE will be coming soon!

 

http://autonomieprojects.com/

"21" The Beginning of an Era

Posted on March 18, 2014

Group Show at Prohibition Gallery

Opening Reception Saturday, March 22 6-9pm

Prohibition_announce

 

"For every prohibition you create, you also create an underground." -Jello Biafra

When the 18th amendment was enacted, creating the Prohibition Era, it divided a nation. Bootleggers spread the flow of alcohol illegally to speakeasies across the nation, while zealots proselytized the cleansing of a people. 13 years later, the 21st Amendment overruled prohibition, making it the only amendment to ever overrule another amendment. Citizens were again allowed to drink. It revitalized an American culture. In a similar vein, Prohibition Gallery is hosting18 artists (as a shout out to our namesake) to partake in a group show celebrating the right of choice, as a constitutional right. All the artists' individuality is not hampered by the expectations of a controlled society. We are the misfits.

The show is featuring work by...
Virginia Broersma
Susan Doe
Bill Faecke
MX Farina
Luke Haynes 
James Johnson
Deborah Lambert 
Kara Liebowitz 
Diana Madriaga 
Wyatt Mills 
David O'Brien
Louis Oberlander
Charlotte Patterson 
Mike Reynolds 
Christopher Russell 
Anne-Elizabeth Sobieski
Brian Tarpey
Camilla Taylor 

Categories: exhibition

Status of Portraiture: Artist Talk

Posted on February 04, 2014

Bower_broersma

Come join us this coming Saturday, February the 8th at 4:30pm for an artist talk with Virginia Broersma, Alec Egan, Roni Feldman, Andrew Foster, Frank J. Stockton, Laurence McNamara, and Erica Ryan Stallones about how portraiture figures into their art practice as well as how the status of portraiture has being prolematized in the early twenty-first century. Has portraiture been on the decline as a genre of serious interest by artists and critics alike or are we living through the era of consummate portraiture where people are more interested in the theater of the self than ever before do to the rise of social media? If so, what does painting have to offer the discussion in an era of motion gifs, facebook tags and the wild proliferation of filters and image enhancement techniques offered by digital media? Is portraiture as a genre at the same impasse painting and photography faced in the last century? Come explore these questions and more at Autonomie's roundtable on their current exhibition as part of The Foundation for Art Resources Artists Talk Art (ATA) series. Discussion moderated by Grant Vetter.

 

Place: Autonomie, 4742 West Washington Blvd. Los Angeles, Ca. 90016

Time: 4:30 to 6pm, Saturday, February 8th.

 

'Join' the Facebook Event: https://www.facebook.com/events/272644529552569/?previousaction=join&source=1

'Like' Autonomie: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Autonomie/183246791719675

'Like' FAR (Foundation for Art Resources) https://www.facebook.com/foundationforartresources

Categories: event

Group Show at Blackstone Gallery

Posted on February 04, 2014

B L A C K S T O N E G A L L E R Y presents

"Group Show" 

Feb 6th - March 2nd

(Opening Reception) - Feb 8th - 5pm to 8pm

"Group Show" is an exhibition of paintings from various contemporary southern California artists.

Featuring the work of 

- John Kilduff - http://johnkilduff.com/

- Virginia Broersma - http://www.virginiabroersma.com/

- Alex Schaefer - http://www.alexschaeferart.com/

- Timothy Lynch - http://clubkemo.tumblr.com/

- David Hendrickson - http://dhendrickson.com/

- Steven Higgins - http://www.steventhomashiggins.com/

- Gary Ochoa - http://www.garyochoa.com/


Blackstone Gallery 
901 s. Broadway
Los angeles 90015
(909) 746 6308
www.blackstonegalleryla.com

Categories: exhibition

C-Note: An Exhibition and Fundraiser for Syrian Children

Posted on February 04, 2014

JAUS is pleased to present C-Note: An Exhibition and Fundraiser for Syrian Children.

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Featuring works by: Luciana Abait, Karla Aguíñiga, Mario Ayala, Kelly Barrie, Raul Baltazar, Susanne Melanie Berry, Nicole Bille, Virginia Broersma, Daniel Caballero, Gul Cagin, Clayton Campbell, Matt Carter, Miri Chais, Brian Chambers, York Chang, Carlos Chavez, Sarah Chenault, Aaron Dadacay, Joshua Daniel (aka Cole Lodge 365), Michael Dee, Jenny Donaire, Martin Durazo, Jay Erker, Nancy Evans, Dan Everett, Don Flores, David French, Yvette Gellis, Eben Goff, Daniel Gonzalez (aka DGZB), Elan Greenwald, Kio Griffith, Maria Guerrero Solarzano, Sherin Guirguis, Ashley Hagen, Katy Hamrock, Michelle Carla Handel, Carlson Hatton, Luis Guillermo Hernandez, Fatima Hoang, Ichiro Irie, Karin Jancuk, Astrelle Johnquest, Gilbert Johnquest, Emily Jones, Lucas Kazansky, Heidi Kidon, Phil Kim, Svetlana Linetsakaya, Vida Liu, Aleve Mei Loh, Emily Marchand, David McDonald, Marissa Mercado, Marcos Lutyens, Mathew Manos, Katherine Martin, Robert Medina, Kathleen Melian, Rebeca Mendes, Dustin Metz, Bryan Miller, John Mills, Ashley Mistriel, Robert Moya, Ofunne Obiwame, Dasha Orlova, Ruby Osorio, Julia Paull, Atilio Pernisco, Suzy Poghosyan, Stephen Praise, Max Presneill, Rebeca Puga, Jason Ramos, Sarah Riedmann, Bryan Ricci, Ana Rodriguez, Jaklin Romine, Nathan Rosser, Kiki Seror, Mahya Shamai, Chris Sicat, Emily Silver, Skunkworks, Kate Slovin, Lisa C Soto, Collin Stafford, CR Stecyk III, Jason Michael Stepina, Macha Suzuki, Olguin Tapia, Don Tinling, Melly Trochez, Devon Tsuno, Marjan Vayghan, Maria Villote, Eric Vrymoed, Nathan Warner, Tessie Whitmore, Lena Wolek, Eve Wood, Peter and Samantha Rae Wu ... and more!

As of October 27, 2013, the third year of Syria’s internal conflict, 1,110,860 children, that is to say over one million children live as refugees in neighboring countries. This is more than the total number of children living in the city of Los Angeles. Over 3 million live inside Syria, displaced, orphaned, living in poverty, and caught in the line of fire. They need food, water, medicine, protection, and education.

The exhibition will be a pop-up, salon style exhibition at JAUS featuring works by over 100 artists from Southern California, in an effort to raise awareness, contribute to the humanitarian effort, and raise money that will be donated to UNICEF (United Nations Children’s Fund) specifically directed to children affected by the Syrian crisis.

Every piece in the show will be available for $100. All proceeds from the exhibition will be donated to UNICEF’s efforts in Syria.

The works in the exhibition will span a variety of media, genre, and subject matter. In its entirety, we hope the project conveys a spirit of non-violence, co-existence and harmony among those with differentphilosophies and ways of life.

A special thanks to UNICEF and UNICEF Next Generation for their kind support.  Also thanks to 18th Street Arts Center for their generosity and support.

 

JAUS
11851 La Grange Ave. Los Angeles, CA, 90025
by appointment only
email: info@jausart.com
tel: 424.248.0781
 
www.jausart.com        

 

Categories: exhibition, event

Status of Portraiture

Posted on January 09, 2014
at AUTONOMIE
 
I am included in a survey show of 14 artists working through the questions of portraiture in the early 21st century.
Opening Reception:  SATURDAY, JANUARY 11th from 5pm to 8:30pm
 
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THE STATUS OF PORTRAITURE
While portraiture has long been seen as a sign of cultural 'status' and class distinction this survey of Los Angeles portraiture examines the varied approaches being taken up by today's painters with regard to rendering a likeness, not only of a seated subject, but of the subject of portraiture itself. These disparate approaches to re-imagining portrait painting not only include formal innovations but they also question many of the traditional assumptions of the genre. By challenging historical 
conventions such as naturalism, stability and easy identification of the subject, all of the painters in The Status of Portraiture challenge us to think differently about what constitutes a portrait in the 21st century. Conflating interior and exterior states with different personal and theoretical concerns the painters in The Status of Portraiture give us a new series of motifs for thinking about access to the image of another, and in so doing, perhaps even another route into thinking about ourselves.  

 
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ARTISTS:
Justin Bower, Virginia Broersma, Josh Dildine, Alec Egan, Jay Erker, Andrew Foster, Roni Feldman, Steve Hampton, 
Constance Mallinson, Laurence McNamara, Max Presneill, Jason Ramos, Erica Ryan Stallones and Frank Stockton.

Event on Artslant
 
 
 
Categories: exhibition